dry farming

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dry farming,

farming system adopted in areas having an annual rainfall of approximately 15 to 20 in. (38.1–50.8 cm)—with much of the rainfall in the spring and early summer—where irrigation is impractical. Seeding rates are used that correspond to the soil water supply; management practices that minimize water loss and soil erosion are also utilized. The land is often summer-fallowed (not used for crops) in alternate years to conserve moisture. Dry-land crops must be either drought-resistant or drought-evasive, i.e., maturing in late spring or fall; special varieties of crops such as wheat, barley, corn, sorghum, and rye are often used.

dry farming

[¦dri ′färm·iŋ]
(agriculture)
Production of crops in regions having sparse rainfall without the use of irrigation by employing cultivation techniques that conserve soil moisture.
References in periodicals archive ?
This work was supported by the China Support Program (2006BAD29B03) for Dryland Farming in the 11th 5-year plan period.
Second, dryland farming increased greatly during the 1900s in response to the rapidly escalating capital costs of irrigation.
Rengasamy P (2002) Transient salinity and subsoil constraints to dryland farming in Australian sodic soils: an overview.
This social construction of agricultural landscape can be found from the folklores of different regions which provide the social and cultural meaning and perception of land, rain, seeds, water and drought in dryland farming societies.
Colorado's dryland farming regions have the potential (in rotation with winter wheat) to add nearly 30 million gallons of capacity-or about $80 million in rural economic activity.
Areas of southwest Georgia, too sandy for dryland farming, were cleared and put into row crops and vegetable production using center pivots.
Additional measures, including strengthened support for agricultural research and extension and opportunities for reduction in costs of production, are essential to promote more sustainable modes of dryland farming, for example, water-efficient processes for paddy cultivation, promotion of millets, oilseeds, and pulses and use of low-external inputs in agriculture.
Initial chapters address principles underlying all dryland farming, such as water conservation, crop choices and rotation principles, and integration of ecological pest management with rotation design.
A dryland farming showcase, the Farm Progress Show features the latest in dryland farming technology and draws international dealers, manufacturers, and farmers from around 20 to 30 different countries.
eds (1998) Farming Action -- Catchment Reaction: The effect of dryland farming on the natural environment, Collingwood, CSIRO Publications.
Kirch's observations about the functioning of dryland agricultural systems form a temporal model that provides a general scenario, presuming a stable environment, for societies which have implemented dryland farming over long periods of time.
The principal use of lands within the reservation is grazing and dryland farming.