Dryopteris


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

Dryopteris

 

a genus of ferns of the family Aspidiaceae. There are about 150 species, distributed in the temperate zone of Eurasia and North America and, to a lesser extent, in the tropical regions of Asia, Africa, and South America. The USSR has about 15 species. Especially widely distributed is the male fern (D. filix-mas). D. carthusiana (formerly D. spinulosa) is found in damp, mossy forests of the European USSR, the Caucasus, and Siberia. Both species are used medicinally as anthelmintics. D. fragrans grows on cliffs and slopes of the northern European USSR, in Siberia, and in the Far East; D. cristata grows in humid regions and swamps in the European USSR and Western Siberia.

References in periodicals archive ?
Biological Flora of the British Isles: Dryopteris carthusiana, D.
Cover HERBACEOUS LAYER Osmunda cinnamomea 68 (12) 30 (42) Rubus hispidus 59 (10) 11 (15) Rubus allegheniensis 38 (7) 9 (12) Maianthemum canadense 76 (13) 4 (5) Acer rubrum 73 (13) 4 (5) Trientalis borealis 62 (11) 2 (3) Dryopteris spinulosa 43 (8) 3 (5) Ilex verticillata 24 (4) 2 (2) Lindera benzoin 16 (3) 1 (2) Viola sp.
DRYOPTERIS {dry-OP-ter-iss} Adanson 1763 * Wood Ferns * [Greek, drys, tree (oak), and pteris, fern; an allusion to their woodland habitat.
The royal fern (Osmunda regalis) is the grandest of them all but there are many more, like the Dryopteris, hart's tongue (Asplenium) and the Polypodiums, that put out fresh leaves for the winter.
Male fern is the common fern and there are a number of varieties of Dryopteris available such as copper shield fern, which is also known as the Japanese red shield fern and I have even seen it sold as the painted fern.
Relationship and evolutionary origins of polyploid Dryopteris (Dryopteridaceae) from Europe inferred using nuclear pgiC and plastid trnL-F sequence data.
When Dryopteris erythrosora unfurls its new fronds, they are decidedly orange.
Dryopteris affinis, the Golden Male Fern, can reach 90 cm (36in) tall and has produced some wonderful variations with twisted and congested fronds that add another dimension to the display.
silica concretions in Dryopteris and true stegmata in most Trichomanes
parvifolium) (Pawuk and Kissinger 1989), large blueberry-bearing shrubs that are important winter browse for black-tailed deer; (2) habitats dominated by devil's club (Oplopanax horridus) comprised approximately 32% of Channel Island (the understory of those habitats frequently contained Dryopteris ferns of which rhizomes were an important winter food for deer; Gillingham et al.