Dubcek


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

Dubcek

Alexander . 1921--92, Czechoslovak statesman. His reforms as first secretary of the Czechoslovak Communist Party (1968--69) prompted the Russian occupation (1968) and his enforced resignation. Following the uprising of 1989 he was elected chairman of the new Czechoslovak Federal Assembly
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
In September 1969--after presenting Gustav Nikodimovich Husak, who had replaced Dubcek, with the Order of Lenin--Brezhnev made one of his most detailed of all the diary entries.
Keane provides us with a striking description of Havel's unique response to the severe repression of the Communist regime in the years after Prime Minister Dubcek was deposed.
La Primavera de Praga, de hecho, marco un antes y un despues en la trayectoria del partido espanol que, ante la represion del intento democratizador impulsado por Dubcek, rompio por primera vez su tradicional fidelidad incondicional a Moscu, oponiendose publicamente a la linea dictada por el PCUS (5).
In 1989, Alexander Dubcek, the former Czechoslovak Communist leader who was deposed in a Soviet-led Warsaw Pact invasion in 1968, was named president of the country's parliament.
Although few remember it now, it was still Alexander Dubcek, the former Communist Party leader associated with the Prague Spring, not dissident playwright Vaclav Havel, who was the political favourite across the country.
In this brief period of freedom, Alexander Dubcek brought back to Prague a level of democracy and hope of prosperity.
EVENTS 1968: Russia flexed its military muscle by clamping down on Western-looking Czech Prime Minister Alexander Dubcek.
We have an Archbishop Makarios Marg, named after the first president of Cyprus, an Olof Palme road, and roads named after Kwame Nkrumah, Nasser and Mandela, Ataturk, Alexander Dubcek, but none for, say, John Kennedy who came to India's assistance in our dark hour of defeat in 1962.
1978), From Dubcek to Charter 77: A Study of "Normalization" in Czechoslovakia, 1968-1978.
Thanks to the courage of millions of unnamed and largely forgotten martyrs who fought to end Marxism-Leninism -- the true heroes of the Soviet Union -- and largely forgotten dissident leaders like Imre Nagy in Hungary and Alexander Dubcek in Czechoslovakia, followed by Lech Walesa in Poland, aided and abetted by the Polish Pope John Paul II, with Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher cheering from the bleachers, communism in Russia imploded, bringing down with it the Soviet puppet regimes in Eastern Europe.
Al final de su vida regreso emocionalmente a su tierra natal, con la factura de dos libros sobre la historia de Europa central y un libro sobre tres prominentes checos: Masaryk, Benes y Dubcek.
It began on January 5, 1968, when reformist Alexander Dubcek was elected the First Secretary of Communist Party of Czechoslovakia, and continued until August 21, when the Soviet Union and all members of the Warsaw Pact, with the exception of Romania, invaded the country to halt the reforms.