carcinoma

(redirected from Ductal carcinoma in situ)
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Related to Ductal carcinoma in situ: lobular carcinoma in situ

carcinoma:

see neoplasmneoplasm
or tumor,
tissue composed of cells that grow in an abnormal way. Normal tissue is growth-limited, i.e., cell reproduction is equal to cell death. Feedback controls limit cell division after a certain number of cells have developed, allowing for tissue repair
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.

carcinoma

[‚kärs·ən′ō·mə]
(medicine)
A malignant epithelial tumor.

carcinoma

Pathol
1. any malignant tumour derived from epithelial tissue
2. another name for cancer
References in periodicals archive ?
Risk of invasive breast carcinoma among women diagnosed with ductal carcinoma in situ and lobular carcinoma in situ, 1988-2001.
The natural history of low-grade ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast in women treated by biopsy only revealed over 30 years of long-term follow-up.
Mortality among women with ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast in the population-based surveillance, epidemiology and end results program.
Sentinel lymph node positivity of patients with ductal carcinoma in situ or microinvasive breast cancer," The American Journal of Surgery, vol.
Ductal carcinoma in situ is confined entirely to the ductal system of the breast.
neu overexpression correlates with extent of disease in large cell ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast.
In addition, this Multiplex IHC test is particularly useful to reduce false negatives and false positives for microinvasion; when there are overlapping features of lobular carcinoma in situ and ductal carcinoma in situ in a lesion; when there is necrosis potentially masking microinvasion; to differentiate higher nuclear grade LCIS patients such as pleomorphic lobular carcinoma in situ which may mimic DCIS; and in LCIS samples where LCIS cells grow into a duct, or the lobule becomes distended so that its appearance is similar to a duct, making the differentiation of LCIS and DCIS more challenging.
The new findings suggested that hormones helped promote breast tumour growth of pre-existing, clinically latent hormone-dependent cancers, not only increasing the incidents of invasive cancer, but also the risk of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS).
The 53-year-old was diagnosed with a non-invasive form of the disease called ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in February.