Duisburg

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Duisburg

(düs`bo͝ork), city (1994 pop. 536,800), North Rhine–Westphalia, W Germany, at the confluence of the Rhine and Ruhr rivers. Located in the RuhrRuhr
, region, c.1,300 sq mi (3,370 sq km), W Germany; a principal manufacturing center of Germany and formerly known as one of the world's greatest industrial complexes. In the 1980s the coal and steel industries declined, leading to serious unemployment.
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 district, it is the largest inland port in the world and a center for iron and steel production. Other manufactures include shipbuilding, brewing, heavy machinery, textiles, chemicals, and metal and wood products. The city is home to one of the world's longest span truss bridges, the Duisburg-Neuenkamp Bridge, which stretches 1,148 feet (350 m) across the Rhine. Duisburg was a port in Roman times. It passed to the duchy of Cleves in 1290, and in 1614 was acquired, with Cleves, by Brandenburg. Its growth as an industrial center dates from c.1850. As a center of the German armaments industry, the city was heavily bombed during World War II. The Gothic Salvator Church is the burial place of the geographer and cartographer G. MercatorMercator, Gerardus
, Latin form of Gerhard Kremer
, 1512–94, Flemish geographer, mathematician, and cartographer. He studied in Louvain, where he had a geographical establishment (1534). From 1537 to 1540 he surveyed and mapped Flanders.
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. Wilhelm LehmbruckLehmbruck, Wilhelm
, 1881–1919, German sculptor. He studied at Düsseldorf and went to Paris in 1910. Influenced at first by Rodin, Brancusi, and Maillol, he later arrived at his own highly individual style. His large, elongated figures express a dramatic poignancy.
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, the sculptor, was born in Duisburg, and his works are displayed there in a museum. The annexation in 1975 of four surrounding cities greatly enlarged Duisburg.

Duisburg

 

a city in the Federal Republic of Germany, in the Land of Nordrhein-Westphalen. Population, 457,900 (1970), compared with 501,000 in 1963 and 434,600 in 1939. Situated on the right bank of the Rhine, at the mouth of the Ruhr River and the beginning of the Rhine-Herne Canal.

Duisburg, one of West Germany’s major river ports (Duisburg-Ruhrort), is accessible to ocean vessels and had a freight turnover of 40.5 million tons in 1969. It is also West Germany’s second most important railroad hub, with a freight turnover of 21 million tons in 1968, and a major industrial center, employing about 150,000 workers. Duisburg contains about one-fourth of the production capacity of West Germany’s ferrous metallurgy (the August Thyssen Foundry, the Niederrheinische Foundry, and the Ruhrort-Meiderich plant) and a considerable part of nonferrous metallurgy (the Duisburger Copper Foundry plants). Also concentrated in Duisberg are the output of structural steel and heavy machines (the Demag, Mannesmann, and other plants), as well as river shipbuilding (more than one-third of river shipbuilding in West Germany is done in Duisberg). Other industries include oil refining, chemical production (including petrochemistry, basic inorganic chemistry, and coal chemistry), flour milling, beer brewing, and tobacco processing. There are coal mines in Duisburg and its surroundings. Cargoes arriving on the Rhine include mostly ores, scrap metals, petroleum, lumber products, and grain; exports are mainly coal, coke, metals, and machines. Welding and river-shipbuilding institutes are located in Duisburg. Four bridges span the Rhine. The city has been known since the 13th century. Several suburbs were incorporated into Duisburg in 1905 and even more in 1929, including such important centers as Ruhrort.

O. V. VITKOVSKII

Duisburg

an industrial city in NW Germany, in North Rhine-Westphalia at the confluence of the Rivers Rhine and Ruhr: one of the world's largest and busiest inland ports; university (1972). Pop.: 506 496 (2003 est.)
References in periodicals archive ?
La mairie de Duisbourg et les responsables de la Love Parade etaient accuses de negligence hier lundi, documents a l'appui, deux jours apres que 19 personnes ont ete pietinees a mort lors du festival techno dans cette ville de l'ouest de l'Allemagne.
De nombreuses voix assuraient ainsi que Duisbourg, qui compte moins de 500.
Le quotidien de Cologne, KE[micro]lner Stadt-Anzeiger, assurait que le maire conservateur de Duisbourg, Adolf Sauerland, avait ete averti par ecrit en octobre 2009 que le terrain de l'ancienne gare de fret etait trop petit.