Dulcinea


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Related to Dulcinea: Don Quixote

Dulcinea

beautiful peasant woman idealized by Don Quixote. [Span. Lit.: Don Quixote]

Dulcinea

(del Toboso) country girl, whom Quixote apotheosizes as guiding light. [Span. Lit.: Don Quixote]

Dulcinea

as Quixote’s ideal; now, generic for ‘sweetheart.’ [Span. Lit.: Don Quixote, Espy, 128]
References in periodicals archive ?
Marketing itself as a premium brand and experience, Dulcinea is actually fashioned after a consumer packaged goods company.
For him she is a "beautiful and exalted lady" whose burlap shift is silk, horse-mane tresses golden strands, sour smell a fragrance, and whose advances the knight, pledged to Dulcinea, must reject with gallant apologeticalness.
carta, escrita en verso de arriba abajo, a mi senora Dulcinea del
Montes on depictions of the main characters in piano music, and Consuelo Martin Collinet on representations of Dulcinea in works by Ravel, Ibert and Rodrigo.
Dulcinea Sweet 'n Crisp cantaloupe is crisp like a juicy apple and is being introduced to California consumers as a Dulcinea exclusive.
The joint venture, Dulcinea Farms LLC, will market Dulcinea[TM] branded produce items, including the PureHeart[TM] miniature seedless watermelon and a new ultra-sweet Tuscan style cantaloupe.
Dulcinea is a name that means "sweet one," from the story of Don Quixote--whose theology of optimism caused him to see only beauty in a woman with a checkered past.
Comparing Beatrice to Don Quixote, he wrote that "she finished up enmeshed in her own self-deception, adulating a regime [the USSR] which bore as little relation to the Fabian Good Life as Dulcinea del Toboso to the Mistress of Don Quixote's dreams.
Also while at Casale, Roberto finds his own Dulcinea del Toboso in the person of Anna Maria Novarese, or Francesca (there is some confusion over her name, which might recall the confusion surrounding the name of the gentleman of La Mancha).
Later when Betsy, his would-be Dulcinea, refuses to see him, a paranoid misogyny appears in Travis' journal as she metamorphoses from "the angel" amid the "filthy mess" into a member of the despised "them": "I realize now how much she is like the others, so cold and distant.
When Don Quixote looked at Aldonza, the outcast, he saw the princess, Dulcinea.
Paulson's remark that Quixote's attitudes toward his mistress Dulcinea represent "the secularization of belief into pure imagination" (94) are thus inappropriate from an historical perspective.