Dust Bowl

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Dust Bowl,

the name given to areas of the U.S. prairie states that suffered ecological devastation in the 1930s and then to a lesser extent in the mid-1950s. The problem began during World War I, when the high price of wheat and the needs of Allied troops encouraged farmers to grow more wheat by plowing and seeding areas in prairie states, such as Kansas, Texas, Oklahoma, and New Mexico, which were formerly used only for grazing. After years of adequate yields, livestock were returned to graze the areas, and their hooves pulverized the unprotected soil. In 1934 strong winds blew the soil into huge clouds called "dusters" or "black blizzards," and in the succeeding years, from December to May, the dust storms recurred. Crops and pasture lands were ruined by the harsh storms, which also proved a severe health hazard. The uprooting, poverty, and human suffering caused during this period is notably portrayed in John SteinbeckSteinbeck, John,
1902–68, American writer, b. Salinas, Calif., studied at Stanford. He is probably best remembered for his strong sociological novel The Grapes of Wrath, considered one of the great American novels of the 20th cent.
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's The Grapes of Wrath. Through later governmental intervention and methods of erosion-prevention farming, the Dust Bowl phenomenon has been virtually eliminated, thus left a historic reference.

Bibliography

See D. Worster, Dust Bowl: The Southern Plains in the 1930s (1979); T. Egan, The Worst Hard Time (2005); K. Burns, dir., The Dust Bowl (documentary, 2012).

dust bowl

[′dəst ‚bōl]
(climatology)
A name given, early in 1935, to the region in the south-central United States afflicted by drought and dust storms, including parts of Colorado, Kansas, New Mexico, Texas, and Oklahoma, and resulting from a long period of deficient rainfall combined with loosening of the soil by destruction of the natural vegetation; dust bowl describes similar regions in other parts of the world.

dust bowl

a semiarid area in which the surface soil is exposed to wind erosion and dust storms occur

Dust Bowl

the. the area of the south central US that became denuded of topsoil by wind erosion during the droughts of the mid-1930s
References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, Hesse's novel offers readers historical context and complex characters that flesh out the stories Steinbeck tells about the Okie experiences, as well as those presented in other iconic Dustbowl texts like Dorothea Lange's photographs or Woody Guthrie's music.
The settings range from a part of Alaska where winter isn't what it was to the 21st-century dustbowl of northern China.
Indeed, in terms of both appearance and musical style, Welch and Rawlings give the impression of having come directly from a Dorothea Lange dustbowl photograph, so there have been ample opportunities for media pigeonholing.
They are suspicious of US motives, and say an American missile hit the turbines powering the co-operative's irrigation system during the war, turning outlying farms to a dustbowl.
Women in the Dustbowl era had to do sharecropping and migrant picking to secure their families' survival.
The site offers seven million digital items including manuscripts, sheet music, photographs, films and sound recordings, that are organized in more than 100 collections, such as Civil War Photographs, History of the American West, and Voices from the Dustbowl.
Snow blocked mountain roads as far south as Cadiz and even fell in the dustbowl region of Almeria.
producers looking for the right colonial palacio, searing desert, smoking volcano or dustbowl village.
With a series of drawings concerning the controversial "rational individualist" Ayn Rand by Christoph Schafer, photographs of a dislocated Belgrade by Katja Eydel, sound installations by the Ultra-red group, Woody Guth rie appropriations by Global Dustbowl Ballads, and Dierk Schmidt's paraphrase of Gericault, among others, the curators made a sophisticated loop around the theme of activism in art.
All the water's left town in Steinbeck's Depression-era classic about the migration of dustbowl sodbusters to the promised land of southern California.
History: Read about other severe 20th century droughts: the Dustbowl in the U.
The photograph by Marry Sohl [May, page 10] is of the Joe Goode Performance Group's production of Doris in a Dustbowl.