Dutar


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Dutar

 

(Persian dotar, from do, two, and tar, string), a plucked stringed instrument. It is widespread in various forms in many countries of the East. In the USSR it is found among the Tadzhiks (dutor), Turkmens, and Uzbeks. It consists of a pear-shaped body, from which extends a long neck with a fingerboard of from 13 to 20 frets made of animal tendons fastened to it. The instrument has two strings (silk or gut), tuned in fourths or, less frequently, fifths. In Uzbekistan the folk dutar has served as the basis for the construction of a family of orchestral dutars (first, alto, bass, and double bass), which have become part of the Uzbek orchestra of folk instruments.

References in periodicals archive ?
There was also a lot to engage one's eyes, as there were so many different instruments being played, some of them rarely or never seen before on the ROHM stage, including the dutar, a type of long-necked string instrument, and the neyanban, a type of bagpipe made out of a goatskin.
115), Baily's own work in learning to record dutar players in Afghanistan, and the overdubbing processes in Peter Gabriel's sessions for the Real World label.
Like the dombra of the Kazakhs, the dutar of the Uzbeks, the rubab of the Tajiks, and the balalayka of the Russians, the komuz is a symbol of the Kyrgyz culture.
During the concerts, local musicians performed with Brazzaville using traditional Uzbek instruments like the doira, gidjak and dutar, uniting two cultures through music.
We began the evening with kilos of lamb and litres of bai jiu, with performers taking turn on the tambur and dutar.
Mothet JP, Round E, Sinet PM, Jouvenceau A, Dutar P, Videau C, et al.
If you thrill to the sound of a duduk, dutar, ghijak, or komuz--or even if you've never heard these traditional Central Asian instruments--Smithsonian Folkways offers two CDs of appetite-whetting music.