Dutch light

Dutch light

A removable glazed sash, used in greenhouses.
References in periodicals archive ?
A hundred years later the traditional Dutch light with its single pain of glass set between groves took the horticultural world by storm - inaugurating the age of vegetables for all seasons.
This is where the real Amsterdammers live--at least the comfortable ones--under their bell gables and step gables, in their own quiet triangle of honeyed Dutch light, so dense that you could part it like a curtain.
When maximum light is essential - in shaded gardens for instance, or where winter crops are important - the Dutch light, which has sloping walls, or the Mansard, with angled roof and wall panels, are worth considering.
For propagation, an aluminium house is just as good as a wooden one, but you want to look out for a Dutch light house.
It was another 100 years before the traditional Dutch light, with its single pain of glass set between grooves took the horticultural world by storm, inaugurating the age of vegetables for all seasons.
We have a lot of old Dutch Lights - the separate wood-framed glass panels from which greenhouses are constructed - so I'm making an impromptu shelter by placing one, raised up on bricks, over the berries (they are planted in one of the raised vegetable beds).
I'll plant it out soon but probably cover the soil where it's going to go with old Dutch lights left over from my nursery.
A cold frame need not be an expensive brick built enclosure with Dutch lights (glass frames).