dyskinesia

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dyskinesia

[‚dis·kə′nē·zhə]
(medicine)
Disordered movements of voluntary or involuntary muscles, particularly those seen in disorders of the extrapyramidal system.
Impaired voluntary movements.
References in periodicals archive ?
These spikes are associated with increases in dyskinesias, Abbott added.
A significant delay was found in the onset of dyskinesia and lower severity of motor symptoms in the pergolide group, Dr.
The dyskinesias are induced from the long-term use of L-Dopa, the standard treatment of the disease.
Similarly, concerns about motor fluctuations and dyskinesias are valid and raise questions about whether starting treatment with dopamine early is potentially a source of problems in the long term.
The vacuous chewing movement (VCM) model of tardive dyskinesia revisited: is there a relationship to dopamine D(2) receptor occupancy?
Dyskinesias improved in all 13 patients, including moderate to marked improvement in 11 (Table 2).
YOPD patients should understand that levodopa does not cause motor complications and dyskinesias.
There was a tendency for a good response to treatment to occur with values within and above the therapeutic range and for dyskinesia to be more common above the therapeutic range.
In this double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, dose-finding study conducted at two sites in Sweden, twenty-two patients were given single doses of eltoprazine and placebo along with a challenge dose of levodopa at each of the 5 treatment visits and assessed for parkinsonian and dyskinesia symptoms over a period of three hours post-treatment.
We are very pleased to present additional robust data from the largest ever clinical program in tardive dyskinesia at this year's American Academy of Neurology Annual Meeting," said Chris O'Brien, M.
Identification of PRRT2 as the causative gene of paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesias.
Tourette's syndrome, Meige syndrome, primary dystonias, Ekbom syndrome (restless legs), spontaneous dyskinesias associated with aging (senile chorea), edentulous chorea