Dytiscidae


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Dytiscidae

[dī′tis·ə‚dē]
(invertebrate zoology)
The predacious diving beetles, a family of coleopteran insects in the suborder Adephaga.

Dytiscidae

 

(predacious diving beetles), a family of water beetles. The body is elongate-oval and flattened; less frequently it is convex. The beetles range in length from 1.5 to 50 mm. The oar-shaped hind legs are for swimming; the forelegs are prehensile. The elongated larvae have legs fitted for swimming, a large head, and sickle-shaped mandibles. The mandibles have ducts for sucking in prey.

Predacious diving beetles are widely distributed. Of the approximately 2,500 species, more than 270 are found in the USSR. The beetles live in fresh or, less frequently, brackish waters; they breathe air, which is stored under the elytra. At night the beetles often emerge from the water and fly. They pupate in soil near the water. The beetles and larvae are active predators and eat various aquatic invertebrates, including the larvae of mosquitoes. Large species, such as Dystiscus marginalis, even prey on tadpoles and young fish, thus sometimes adversely affecting the fishing industry.

References in periodicals archive ?
Barman EH: The biology and immature stages of Dytiscidae (Cole-optera) of central New York State.
Barman EH: A description of the first instar larva of Coptotomus interrogatus (Fabricius) (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae: Coptotominae) with an emphasis on cranial morphology and comments on the phylogeny of basal lineages of Dytiscidae.
Miller KB: On the phylogeny of the Dytiscidae (Insecta: Coleoptera) with emphasis on the morphology of the female reproductive system.
Hilsenhoff WL: Dytiscidae and Noteridae of Wisconsin (Coleoptera).
Alarie Y, CHS Watts and AN Nilsson: Larval morphology of the tribe Matini (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae, Colymbetinae): descriptions of Batrachomatus daemeli, Matus bicarinatus, and Allomatus nannup and phylogenetic relationships.
Chrysomelidae [leaf beetles], Dytiscidae [predaceous diving beetles], and Hemerobiidae [brown lacewings]) consumed by E.
The most common taxa found in all ponds were in the family Chironomidae (Diptera) and the most diverse invertebrate group in the area was the family Dytiscidae (Coleoptera), which was composed of 20 genera.
Coleoptera Curculionidae Xyloterinus Coleoptera Derodontidae Derodontus Coleoptera Dytiscidae Acilius Coleoptera Dytiscidae Agabetes Coleoptera Dytiscidae Agabus Coleoptera Dytiscidae Bidessonotus Coleoptera Dytiscidae Copelatus Coleoptera Dytiscidae Copelatus Coleoptera Dytiscidae Coptotomus Coleoptera Dytiscidae Laccophilus Coleoptera Dytiscidae Neoporus Coleoptera Dytiscidae Rhantus Coleoptera Dytiscidae Thermonectus Coleoptera Elateridae Ampedus Coleoptera Elateridae Ampedus Coleoptera Elateridae Ctenicera Coleoptera Elateridae Ctenicera Coleoptera Elateridae Glyphonyx?
D13 Family Dryopidae Helichus basalis LeConte: C3, D5, D6, D8 Helichusfastigiatus (Say): D5 Helichus lithophilus (Germar): A4, A5, A7, B1, B2, B5, B6, C1, C3, C4, C6, C7, D4, D8, D9 Helichus striatus LeConte: A 10 Family Dytiscidae Agabus spp.
Aquatic beetles (Insecta: Coleptera) of northeastern Ohio (Haliplidae, Dytiscidae, Noteridae, Gyrinidae, Hydrophilidae, Psephenidae, Dryopidae, Elmidae, and Ptilodactylidae).