EDSAC


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EDSAC

(Electronic Delay Storage Automatic Calculator) Developed by Maurice Wilkes at Cambridge University in England and completed in 1949, it was one of the first stored program computers and one of the first to use binary digits. Its memory was initially 512 36-bit words of liquid mercury delay lines, and its input and output were provided by paper tape. The EDSAC could do about 700 additions per second and 200 multiplications per second. It was in routine use at the university until 1958. See delay line memory.


The EDSAC
Using liquid mercury memory, the EDSAC could perform a mind-boggling 700 additions per second. It was one of the first computers to perform calculations in binary. (Image courtesy of Computer Laboratory, University of Cambridge,www.cl.cam.ac.uk)
References in periodicals archive ?
The EDVAC was the predecessor of the EDSAC, the first operational stored-program computer.
Somebody else's self-righteous "calculations" of how much less it would have cost to allot a few extra bytes to represent dates (starting, perhaps with programs written in the 1950s, when the EDSAC had maybe 512 words of memory, total?
Some say spaghetti's a sin But labels are easy to see; And spaghetti has been in the world Since EDSAC I branched with an E.
Maurice Wilkes develops the EDSAC, Electronic Delay Storage Automatic Calculator, the first stored program digital computer to work successfully.