Edmund

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Edmund,

921–46, king of Wessex (939–46), half-brother and successor of Athelstan. Immediately after his accession he had to face an invasion of Irish vikings led by Olaf GuthfrithsonOlaf Guthfrithson
, d. 941, Norse king of Dublin (934–41). His father, Guthfrith, king of Dublin and of York, had been driven out of England by Athelstan in 927. Olaf led (937) his allies, Constantine of Scotland and Owen of Strathclyde, against Athelstan in the battle of
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. He was forced to cede to them the territory between Watling Street and the Northumbrian border (already occupied partly by Danes), and he succeeded in recapturing it in 944 only because of the quarrels among the Norse leaders. In 945 he invaded Strathclyde, which he then turned over to the Scottish king Malcolm I. Edmund was killed in a brawl and was succeeded by his brother Edred.

Edmund

illegitimate son of Earl of Gloucester; conspires against father. [Br. Hist.: King Lear]

Edmund

“a most toad-spotted traitor.” [Br. Lit.: King Lear]
See: Treason

Edmund

Saint, also called Saint Edmund Rich. 1175--1240, English churchman: archbishop of Canterbury (1234--40). Feast day: Nov. 16.
References in periodicals archive ?
sege pinum retail hlaforde ne abihd naefre eadmund hingware on life haepenum here-togan buton he to haelende criste aerest mid ge-leafan on bysum lande gebuge.
Hwaet pa eadmund clypode senne bisceop pe him pa gehendost waes and wid hine smeade hu he pam repan hinguare and-wyrdan sceolde.
pa cwaep eadmund cyning swa swa he ful cene waes "paes ic gewilnige and gewisce mid mode paet ic ana ne belife aefter minum leofum pegnum.
Hwaet pa eadmund cynincg mid pam Hingwar com stod innan his healle haslendes gemyndig and swearp his waepna wolde geaefen-laecan cristes gebysnungum.
Reading Havelok within the specific context of the vitae of the four Anglo-Saxon kings Oswald, Eadmund, Kenelm, and Edward establishes the interpretive framework for understanding a royal romance like Havelok.
Slain 'for ore louerdes loue' and 'for [their] guodnesse', Oswald and Eadmund are martyred in their battles against the pagans (49.
69-72); and the narrator of Kenelm's life makes references to the martyred Oswald and Eadmund, kings 'bi olde dawe[s]' (49.
His personal virtues resemble those of Saints Edward and Eadmund, while the grisly details of his death recall those of Oswald, Edward, and Eadmund.
63) The fact that it is in the shape of a 'noble croiz' lends it obvious Christian meaning (1262-63), but the vita of Eadmund enhances its Christological function.
Thus, I Eadmund 1 states: "Daet is acres[t] paet hi budon, paet pa halgan hadas, pe Godes folc laeron sculon lifes bisne, daet hi heora claennesse healdan be heora hade, swa werhades swa wifhades, swa hwader swa hit sy" [That is their first prescription, that those in holy orders, who ought to instruct God's people by (their) life's example, that they preserve their chastity according to their rank, the same for male religious as for female religious, irrespective of which it is].
Similar names (Eadwine, Eadweard, Eadmund, Eadgar, Eadred, and Eadhild) are attested among members of the West Saxon royal family during this period.