Early Christian architecture


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Early Christian architecture

(200–1025)
The final phase of Roman architecture was influenced by the adoption of Christianity as the state religion and the rise of the Byzantine style. The Roman basilican form was adopted as the ground plan for most early Christian churches. These simple rectangular plans consisted of a nave with two side aisles and a longitudinal and horizontal emphasis.

Early Christian architecture

The final phase of Roman architecture from the 4th to the 6th cent., primarily in church building. Coeval with and related to the rise of Byzantine architecture.
References in periodicals archive ?
Three are on the social context of the early church: Greco-Roman associations, various Jewish manifestations of community, and early Christian architecture.
Thirty Letters commingle autobiography, church activities, and social matters; 25, on how to build a cruciform martyr's shrine, is a key text for early Christian architecture and art.
The veneration of the saints shaped everything from the liturgy to early Christian architecture.
Then there was the early Christian architecture expert Richard Krautheimer, who swore he could date the brickwork in fourth- and fifth-century churches by tasting the mortar.

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