Middle English

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Middle English

the English language from about 1100 to about 1450: main dialects are Kentish, Southwestern (West Saxon), East Midland (which replaced West Saxon as the chief literary form and developed into Modern English), West Midland, and Northern (from which the Scots of Lowland Scotland and other modern dialects developed)
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It is clear that none of the texts that the tremulous hand copied represents his own early Middle English dialect at all accurately.
Sisam 1933: 5, 8; Murray 1995: 128, 2000: 628, 636; Fulk 1996: 499; Mailhammer 2007: 42), and to Kurath's (1956: 438) stance on the operative status of OSL and the loss of geminate (long) consonants in Northeast Midlands and part of the North in Early Middle English.
In the Helsinld Corpus she finds 16 types of-ish in Early Middle English and 2 in ME3 (1350-1420).
From the mid-15th century onwards, the early Middle English strict negative concord rule was showing signs of weakening and NPIs were able to appear in negative clauses, even though they did not do so very often as yet (Kallel 2005).
By analysis of the use of the prefix in several selected texts of Early Middle English the current study confronts the traditional view of the prefix as a meaningless marker of the preterite participle with linguistic data in search of any systemic prerequisites within the verb for the use of the prefix.
Old and Early Middle English, I will rely on Ciszek (2005 and in press).
early Middle English alliterative) verse to the continuum of modes including late Old English rhythmical prose (a notion earlier favoured by Elizabeth Salter and others) and by seeing 'Revival' metre as a deliberate attempt at a precise structure of a distinctive form: there is no continuity to explain because none is perceived.
It comes as a surprise that the Scandinavian loanword tacan is first registered not, as could be expected, in the Northern dialects where contacts with Scandinavian culture were most intense, but in The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, more precisely in its Early Middle English continuation known as The Peterborough Chronicle, the MS E of which comes from Northhamptonshire, i.
My investigations allow me to conclude that some suffixes must have been productive already in Early Middle English.
Early Middle English claims just about one third of the entire number of Middle English verbs.
For example, the influence of the Old English West-Saxon Standard still detectable in early Middle English can be seen in the bulk of texts presented in the ME1 and ME2 corpus subsections originating in the West Midlands.
The process is manifested in the interplay between case and gender marking, which is regarded as an intermediate stage in the process of adjectival disintegration in Early Middle English.

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