Lower Triassic

(redirected from Early Triassic)
Also found in: Wikipedia.

Lower Triassic

[′lō·ər trī′as·ik]
(geology)
The earliest epoch of the Triassic period of geologic time, extending from about 230- to 215,000,000 years ago.
References in periodicals archive ?
Not that such classifications were significant at the time; if you were prey in the early Triassic, says Langer, "it probably wouldn't matter if you were being chased by a basal theropod or a basal sauropodomorph.
We describe the indisputably oldest fossils of the dinosaur lineage: footprints from the Early Triassic (around 250 million years old) from Poland," Brusatte's team wrote in Britain's Royal Society journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B.
Microconchids survived the P/T mass extinction (Taylor & Vinn 2006), and opportunistic microconchids are present in extinction recovery faunas from the Early Triassic of North America (Taylor et al.
The film takes visitors on an immersive journey back to the early Triassic period all the way through the late Cretaceous, following the tiniest of dinosaurs to the largest creatures that walked the earth.
According to the previous exploratory work reports, lower to middle Carboniferous sedimentary rocks of the Khangain series and a late Permian to early Triassic granodiorite stock are exposed within the license area.
The study state that Pangea was integrated at about the beginning of Permian, and reached its acme during Late Permian to Early Triassic.
units A and B were from the Guadalupian age, C-D from the Dzulfian age, E transitional stages, F a Paratirolites horizon with early Triassic age and H and G introduced the Elika Formation in to the section being studied.
In this case, the dead zone, during the Early Triassic period which followed, lasted for a perplexingly long period: five million years.
In part one, Fraser describes how certain geographic areas sustained life despite the Permian extinction and how early Triassic fish and tetrapods evolved into dinosaurlike creatures.
2 ( ANI ): Scientists have said that new fossils have suggested that flowering plants could have originated during the early Triassic, pushing the time believed by about 100 million years.
This Early Triassic age for the Porter Square camptonite is substantially older than the Late Triassic through Early Cretaceous K/Ar ages reported by McHone (1978) for ENA lamprophyre dykes in Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine and the Middle Jurassic ages reported by Hermes et al.

Full browser ?