atmospheric gas

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atmospheric gas

[¦at·mə¦sfir·ik ′gas]
(meteorology)
One of the constituents of air, which is a gaseous mixture primarily of nitrogen, oxygen, argon, carbon dioxide, water vapor, ozone, neon, helium, krypton, methane, hydrogen, and nitrous oxide.
References in periodicals archive ?
From their analysis, the scientists say, chances are that once each year, a 4-meter-wide asteroid will burst in Earth's atmosphere and produce an explosion of about 5 kilotons of TNT--about one-third the size of the Hiroshima blast.
Scheduled for launch in December 2002, Chemistry will measure the creation and decay of trace chemical compounds in the Earth's atmosphere during its six-year mission.
And just as our atmosphere scatters more of the shorter wavelengths so that we see a blue sky, the longer wavelengths like the reds and oranges pass through and those are the ones that make it to the moon - Earth's atmosphere projects these longer wavelengths and bathes the moon in indirect reddish light.
EST splashdown in the Pacific Ocean, just as the spacecraft was beginning to experience Earth's atmosphere.
The satellite known as OCO-2 will be the first dedicated to measuring carbon dioxide in the Earth's atmosphere and will allow scientists to monitor changes in the amount of the greenhouse gas across regions and over time.
Heiner Klinkrad, Chief of ESA's Space Office, told "The one-tonne GOCE satellite is only a small fraction of the 100-150 tonnes of man-made space objects that re-enter Earth's atmosphere annually.
Heiner Klinkrad, Head of ESA's Space Debris Office, said that the one-tonne GOCE satellite is only a small fraction of the 100-150 tonnes of man-made space objects that reenter Earth's atmosphere annually.
But as the sun sets, the blue light waves scatter as they pass through Earth's atmosphere.
The Rensselaer model uses celestial geometry of the sun, Earth, and moon, along with data for the Earth's atmosphere and the moon's peculiar optical properties to create picture-perfect images of lunar eclipses, Cutler said.
And all carry risks-- they might trigger new changes in the earth's atmosphere or ocean currents; they might benefit some parts of the earth while scarcely helping, or even harming, other parts; and disagreements over their developments and deployment might spark heated political tensions, or even wars.
Earth's atmosphere is a huge prism bending the colors in white light in different directions.
Two UK meteorologists have developed a new method of monitoring the effects of climate change in the Earth's atmosphere using GPS satellites.