inner core

(redirected from Earth's core)

inner core

[¦in·ər ′kȯr]
(geology)
The central part of the earth's core, extending from a depth of 3160 miles (5100 kilometers) to the center of the earth. Also known as siderosphere.
References in classic literature ?
I became interested in your story, At the Earth's Core, not so much because of the probability of the tale as of a great and abiding wonder that people should be paid real money for writing such impossible trash.
Cable me at once, at my expense, that there was no basis of fact for your story, At the Earth's Core.
From these, arranged in chronological order, I have set down the following account of the further adventures of David Innes at the earth's core, practically in his own words.
This leads them to believe that the SAA is the most recent display of a recurring phenomenon in Earth's core beneath Africa that then affects the entire globe.
Slight changes in the behaviour of the Earth's core may be responsible for this effect, according to the scientists.
All of these options suggest that behavior of the liquid iron at the top of Earth's core around 1000BC was very different to that seen today.
The sample is shining In the universe of possibility, something new: hydrogen cooled to cryogenic temperatures and crushed into metal under pressure greater than at the earth's core.
New research, however, shows plate dynamics are driven significantly by the additional force of heat drawn from the Earth's core, which also challenges the theory that underwater mountain ranges, known as mid-ocean ridges, are passive boundaries between moving plates.
This result ties the present-day structure of Earth's core to its formation.
Earth's core, which is mostly iron, makes up about one-third of the planet's mass.
5), Emily Conover reported that Earth's core is more than two years younger than the planet's surface, according to new calculations.
The Cluster, fans will remember, is the Gem geo-weapon comprised of millions of artificially fused Gem shards that has been incubating in the Earth's core for thousands of years.