geomagnetic field

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geomagnetic field

[¦jē·ō·mag¦ned·ik ′fēld]
(geophysics)
The earth's magnetic field.
References in periodicals archive ?
The scientists compared the salmon's migratory routes with annual variations in the Earth's magnetic field.
Fortunately, Earth's magnetic field protects us from this dangerous radiation.
They will collect geological data over the next four years to improve scientists' present understanding of the Earth's magnetic field and its seemingly regular changes of polarity.
All of these organisms are documented as being able to sense and use the Earth's magnetic field.
WASHINGTON - A solar storm that shook the Earth's magnetic field on Thursday spared satellite and power systems as it delivered a glancing blow, although it could still intensify until early Friday, US space weather experts said.
When hunting for prey hiding behind foliage or under the snow, a fox appears to creep forward until the angle of the sound coming from its prey aligns with the angle of Earth's magnetic field.
In many migratory animals, the light-sensitive chemical reactions involving the flavoprotein cryptochrome (CRY) are thought to play an important role in the ability to sense Earth's magnetic field.
In turn, this will lead to restoration of the Earth's magnetic field and decrease the incidence of natural disasters.
The horizontal component of the Earth's magnetic field is also determined from the same data.
The belts are actually comprised of high-speed electrically charged particles (electrons and atomic nuclei) that are trapped in the Earth's magnetic field.
Here, Heydenreich is interested in imperfections and inconsistencies of the kind represented by the divergence of "magnetic north" (the naturally vacillating point in the earth's magnetic field that attracts the compass's needle) from "true north" (an artificially stable cartographic approximation).
The combination of magnetic data from the ocean basins and onland basalt piles upward of 4-km thick, provides a chance to link magnetic reversals to biostratigraphy and absolute ages from the exposed rock record, and to understand in detail the behaviour of the earth's magnetic field during the reversal process.