mound

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mound,

prehistoric earthwork erected as a memorial or landmark over a burial place, a defensive embankment, or a site for ceremonial or religious rites or other functions. Such structures are found in many parts of the world, but the name is applied in particular to those of North America, ascribed to a people known as Mound BuildersMound Builders,
in North American archaeology, name given to those people who built mounds in a large area from the Great Lakes to the Gulf of Mexico and from the Mississippi River to the Appalachian Mts.
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. Sometimes the term is also applied to heaps of community refuse, as in shell moundshell mound,
in archaeology, a mound consisting largely of the shells of edible mollusks. It is a kind of kitchen midden found in various parts of the world.
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.

mound

[mau̇nd]
(geology)
A low, isolated, rounded natural hill, usually of earth. Also known as tuft.
A structure built by fossil colonial organisms.

mound

1. a small natural hill
2. Archaeol another word for barrow
3. an artificial ridge of earth, stone, etc., as used for defence
References in periodicals archive ?
It is little wonder that earthen mounds, whatever their purpose, are such a prominent part of the archaeological record in so many parts of the world.
More than 200 people, including a phalanx of media, assembled on Santa Barbara Street next to a makeshift memorial beside a cross-studded, towering earthen mound - the remains of the Jan.
A large photo of the event takes in the entire scene from above: Twenty-one young women wearing only gray or black Helmut Lang shoes lie atop a large earthen mound at the center of the space.
If you have time, take a trip to the Norman stronghold known as Twt Hill,marked by a prominent earthen mound.
Heading west from Dublin, we toured first-millennium monastic ruins and Mesolithic monuments like the incredible Newgrange passage tomb, which is an earthen mound covering an internal stone structure whose roof has remained watertight for 5,000 years.
The housing loan, provided by the Dhaka-based Grameen Bank, a special institution established in 1983 for poor people, transformed the fragile hut into a solid house built on an earthen mound and boasting a tin roof -- a status symbol among low-income Bangladeshis -- mud walls and wooden beams.
The colony's earthen mound is typically 3 to 36 inches high, but in some soil types there will be no visible mound.
By digging air chambers at the base of an earthen mound and layering the floor with wet soil, termites in northern Nigeria keep the temperature inside the mound at exactly 30.
The usual construction procedure was to make a low but wide earthen mound to drain rainwater away from the earthen architecture.
By the time of the early Christian era, prehistoric Sevierville had grown to include wood, thatch, and clay homes clustered around an open plaza, dominated by a large earthen mound used for the house of the chief and one or more public buildings.
220 BC, and possibly to 2860 BC (De Masi 2006), this culture is characterised by its diagnostic ceramics, highland pit-house villages, a mixed collective economy including Araucaria seeds, horticulture, hunting and fishing, and elaborate earthen mound and enclosure complexes (see Beber 2005 for a more detailed summary).