East Friesland

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East Friesland

(frēz`lənd), Ger. Ostfriesland, region and former duchy, c.1,100 sq mi (2,850 sq km), Lower Saxony, NW Germany, on the North Sea. It includes the East Frisian IslandsFrisian Islands
, chain of low-lying islands, off the coasts of the Netherlands, Germany, and Denmark, in the North Sea. The West Frisian Islands, belonging to the Netherlands, are off the shores of North Holland, Friesland, and Groningen provs.
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 and is separated in the west from the Netherlands by the Dollart, an inlet of the North Sea formed by the Ems estuary. Emden, a port and shipbuilding center, is the region's chief city. The extensive moors and marshlands of East Friesland have been partly reclaimed. Cattle raising, sheep raising, and farming are carried on, and there are fisheries along the coastline. East Friesland became a county of the Holy Roman Empire in 1454, was raised to a duchy in 1654, passed to Prussia in 1744, and—after various transfers during the French Revolutionary Wars—was attached to Hanover in 1815.
References in periodicals archive ?
The stepmothers must have treated their children in East Frisia and Canada completely differently.
30) One of the instigators of this revival was Henricus Eyssonius (1683-1742), a self-named "metamorphosed minister" who went to a congregation in East Frisia in 1713.
Imposed on the city by Count Enno II of East Frisia, the Lutheran ordinance introduced a few relatively minor poor-relief provisions.
If it comes to regional breakdowns of "hot tea spots," East Frisia continues to be the traditional "holy land" of tea drinkers with a per capita consumption of 2.
For a few years now, tea consumption in East Frisia has apparently been gradually declining.
And if it were not for the small community in East Frisia, a traditionally heavy tea drinking district that borders Holland in the north of Germany where the per capita consumption is among the highest in the world (2,400 gms), the statistics would be even less impressive.
This quantity is not significant when compared to the average tea consumption by inhabitants of East Frisia in the northernmost part of Germany, who are considered to consume the most tea in Germany.
The West German region of North Germany, including East Frisia, which is traditionally a heavy tea drinking area, accounted for 38.
North Germany and East Frisia, traditionally heavy tea drinking districts, maintained their significance with a share of 40%, which means their consumption is almost 100% higher than their household share of 20.
1988: Takeover of Onno Behrends GmbH, a tea packer with long-standing traditions in Norden, East Frisia (Lower Saxony, in Northern Germany).