Eatanswill

Eatanswill

town where party politics arouses fierce oppositions and loyalties. [Br. Lit.: Dickens Pickwick Papers]
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References in classic literature ?
In a few days, an election is to take place for the borough of Eatanswill, at which Mr.
In The Pickwick Papers, disenfranchisement is the literal fate of the fourteen constituents who sleep through the Eatanswill by-election after reportedly having their brandy and water dosed with laudanum (151-52).
A couple of chapters concern an election at Eatanswill between identical parties with platforms of no real significance.
From comic moments such as the Eatanswill election and the trial of Mrs.
For example, Sudbury was such a scandalously venal borough that, although it survived the Reform Act, it had to be disfranchised in 1844; it was apparently the inspiration for the classic depiction of the Eatanswill election in Dickens' Pickwick Papers.
In The Pickwick Papers the electioneering at Eatanswill makes a farce of elections; in Hard Times, the Parliament is "a little noisy and rather dirty machinery" made up of "honourable gentlemen" deaf, dumb, blind, lame, and dead to every other consideration; 16 in Bleak House, the Court of Chancery ruins people's lives rather than expediting their cases; in Little Dorrit, the Circumlocution Office is a model of bureaucratic inefficiency.
Leave on a minor road and cross the A12 on to the B1068 and A134 to Sudbury (2), a cloth and market town used by Charles Dickens as the model for Eatanswill in The Pickwick Papers.
The Sellborough election in Hillingdon Hall has not made such an impression on English-speaking culture as the Eatanswill election in Pickwick Papers, perhaps because Surtees took the satire too far.
Samuel Slumkey, a candidate for Parliament from the borough of Eatanswill.
His research was written up as the Eatanswill elections in The Pickwick Papers.
As Dickens described in his account of the Eatanswill election, the earliest form of canvassing consisted of shovelling food and drink into them before they went to the polls - relying on the feel-full factor.
They were not like the perpetually squabbling editors of Dickens's Eatanswill Gazette and Independent and would always have a decent respect for one another.