Ebla


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Ebla

(ĕb`lə, ē`blə), an ancient city located in N Syria 34 mi (55 km) S of Aleppo. First excavated in 1964, the ruins of the city were discovered in 1973 by an Italian archaeological expedition from the Univ. of Rome. Most importantly, nearly 20,000 cuneiform tablets were discovered (1975) in the palace archives. The tablets date from the middle of the 3d millennium and are written in Eblaite, a Semitic dialect, as well as in Sumerian. A vocabulary list matching words from the two languages was found among the tablets, which has allowed scholars to translate the previously unknown language of Eblaite. The tablets relate mostly to economic matters, showing that Ebla was a major commercial center trading mostly in textiles, wood, and finished metals. Its influence rivaled that of Egypt and Mesopotamia, stretching from the Sinai peninsula to the Mesopotamian highlands. The documents have been taken to imply that Ebla had as many as 200,000 inhabitants and a government that was administered by 12,000 officials. One of Ebla's earliest dynasties ruled from about 2400 B.C. to 2250 B.C. and was probably destroyed by Naram-Sin of Akkad. Ebla flourished again (2000–1800 B.C.), but was unable to regain its former power. Most of the remaining ruins are from this period. The tablets contain the earliest known reference to Jerusalem. Some scholars claim they also name the five biblical "Cities of the Plain" (Sodom, Gomorah, Admah, Zeboiim, and Bela) just as they are named in Genesis, but this claim has been contested. As an aid to studying the Bible, the tablets are most valuable as a linguistic tool, helping to illuminate some of the more difficult Hebrew readings.
References in periodicals archive ?
The hub are listed together with singers and dancers in Ebla documents recording the issue of clothes; in other words they would seem to be some form of 'entertainer'.
Excavated material like pottery, figurines and stone 'spades' from different sectors of Al-Rawda reveal clear cultural connections with the Orontes valley, Qatna and Ebla in the western part of Syria (Castel et al.
Damascus, SANA -- A series of lectures and a documentary exhibition on the Syrian ruins at Khan Asaad Basha in the Old City of Damascus marked the wrap up of the cultural event celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the Discovery of kingdom of Ebla.
he elegantly describes the textual material from Ebla in detail.
The multiple re-melting and re-cycling of copper lumps and prills into larger units are probably identical with the production of washed or purified copper as described in 3rd-millennium BC cuneiform tablets from Ebla in Syria (Reiter 1997).
The DLAL turned to FileNET and EBLA Computer Consultancy, FileNET's authorized reseller in Kuwait, to help implement a Web Content Management system that could provide legal information accurately and quickly.
The Minister also attended cultural and social activities organized by the Culture Directorate and the Education Directorate at the Cultural Center in Idleb city, including performance by the Ebla troupe for folk arts, a play titled "Land of the Sun," poetry recital, and musical performances.
Da[beta] sich alteste Ritualtraditionen in der hethitischen Uberlieferung erhalten haben, zeigt das Detail des Eisenringes, mit welchem in den Ritualen aus Ebla die Substituts-Ziege versehen wird" (p.
2300 BC, approximately contemporary with Ebla royal palace G and its archives.
Archbishop of Jerusalem in Exile Hilarion Capucci also quit attending the exhibition, which was organized by Professor Paolo Matthiae, the discoverer of landmark Ebla, one of the earliest kingdoms in Syria, and attended by Italian Minister of Culture and former Governor of Rome.
11) does tell us it is about the destruction of Ebla.