Ecbatana


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Ecbatana

(ĕkbăt`ənə, ĕkbətä`nə), capital of ancient MediaMedia
, ancient country of W Asia whose actual boundaries cannot be defined, occupying generally what is now W Iran and S Azerbaijan. It extended from the Caspian Sea to the Zagros Mts.
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, later the summer residence of Achaemenid and Parthian kings, beautifully situated at the foot of Mt. Elvend and NE of Behistun. In 549 B.C. it was captured by Cyrus the Great. It possessed a royal treasury and was plundered in turn by Alexander, Seleucus, and Antiochus III. The site has never been thoroughly excavated, since it is covered by the modern city, HamadanHamadan
, city (1991 pop. 349,653), capital of Hamadan prov., W Iran, at the foot of Mt. Alwand. Located at an altitude of 6,000 ft (1,829 m), it is the trade center for a fertile farm region where fruit and grain are grown.
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, Iran, where the traditional tomb of Esther is still honored by the Jewish community. Ecbatana was the Achmetha of Ezra 6.2 and the Apocrypha. It is also called Hangmatana.

Ecbatana

an ancient city in Iran, on the site of modern Hamadan; capital of Media and royal residence of the Persians and Parthians
References in periodicals archive ?
At the beginning of the establishment of Nisa city-state, near present Ashgabat, and Dargaz, near Abiward, were king's residences, while in summer when king left Babel to Medes, Parthia, and Gorgan, sometimes Ecbatana and sometimes Hecatompylos served as residences of the monarchy.
29) Antigonus retired to winter quarters near Ecbatana for the winter of 316/315 (Diod.
Venus figurines can also be seen in Susa, Naqsh-e Rustam, Ecbatana, Kangavar, Persepolis, Estakhr-e Pars and some other places.
76, the execution of Phraortes by Darius: pasavasim Hagmatanaiy uzmayapatiy akunavam, "After that I [Darius] impaled him [made him on a stake] at Ecbatana.
4: the governor Tattannu is probably not connected with the Tattannu archive; see Stolper, "Tobits in Reverse: More Babylonians at Ecbatana," AMI NF 23 (1990): 168, n.
To the summary of evidence on Babylonians in Ecbatana add AMI NF 23 163f.
The fourteen chapters of the book then deal with the history of the Medes and the Achaemenids (from Cyrus to Artaxerxes I), the capitals (Susa, Ecbatana, Pasargadae, Persepolis), Persia and the Greeks, and religions (Zoroastrianism, the Magi, Mithraism, and - in the appendix - the spread of Egyptian religion).