Ecce Homo


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Ecce Homo

Pilate’s presentation of Jesus to Jews. [N.T.: John 19:5]
See: Mockery
References in periodicals archive ?
13) In Ecce Homo, Nietzsche's autobiography, which was written in the Fall of 1888, but not published until 1908, the author explicitly conjoins the Dionysian with the Ubermensch, defines his anthropological model as a person overflowing with profuse power and concludes: "Aber das ist der Begriff des Dionysos selbsf" (KSA 6: 344; see also: 345).
Ecce Homo is a documentary series which explores humanities and studies the different aspects of human behaviour.
An appeal to Ecce Homo as an instance of how one "becomes what one is" (an ambiguous formula) is odd because it is a deceptive "autobiography" that misrepresents the author by means of a mask of almost mocking grandiosity while clearly expressing his attitudes, values, and thoughts.
Fernandez's Ecce Homo is certainly one because of the ways it demonstrates the affinities and fundamental differences between the Spanish and Italian idioms.
Mark Fisher MP opened the exhibition Anthony van Dyck: Ecce Homo and the Mocking of Christ at the Barber Institute of Fine Arts, the University of Birmingham last month.
Friedrich Nietzsche, "Thus Spoke Zarathustra," in Ecce Homo, trans.
In Ecce Homo Young discovers a "self-deifying megalomania.
The fresco, Ecce Homo (Behold the Man) by Elias Garcia Martinez, had been in a Spanish church for more than 100 years but had deteriorated due to dampness.
In 1999, his Ecce Homo occupied Trafalgar Square's fourth plinth to great critical acclaim and in 2001, he represented Britain at the Venice Biennale.
3), and Ecce Homo, a life-size cast of a man in the pose of Christ before Pilate that occupied the fourth plinth in Trafalgar Square in 2000 (Fig.
A product of the anthropological curiosity and the fantasies associated with colonial exploitation, these objects were intended to illustrate the exoticism of distant lands, supposedly inhabited by strange beings like the unicorn (whose horn turns out to be a narwhal's) or the "wild man" (an African slave covered in goatskins)--this cruel invention being the reference in one of the most successful pieces in the Vienna exhibition, Ecce Homo, 2006.
The Anthony van Dyck painting is just one of the prestigious works on display at the Ecce Homo and the Mocking of Christ exhibition at the gallery at the University of Birmingham's Edgbaston campus.