Echinopluteus

echinopluteus

[‚ek·ə·nō′plüd·ē·əs]
(invertebrate zoology)
The bilaterally symmetrical larva of sea urchins.

Echinopluteus

 

a free-swimming larva of sea urchins. Echinoplutei have three to four pairs of long “arms,” a gut, and three pairs of coelomic saccules. The margins of the perioral depressions and the surface of the “arms” bear long cilia, by means of which the larva swims. Several months are required to complete the development of an echinopluteus. The body of a young sea urchin forms on the left side of the larva from a section of the ectoderm, two coelomic saccules, and the midgut. The remaining larger part of the echinopluteus’ body dies off in the process of its development.

References in periodicals archive ?
Une larve de Spatangide Echinopluteus solidus (Mortensen), du plancton de Villefranche-sur-Mer.
Optimum water temperature for the echinopluteus larvae Hemicentrotus pulcherrimus.
Effects of temperature on the body form, growth, electron transport system activity, and development rate of an echinopluteus.
electron transport system activity, and developmental rate of an echinopluteus.
Sniffing out new data and hypotheses on the form, function and evolution of the echinopluteus post-oral vihratile lobe.
tu-berculata with a feeding echinopluteus larva and H.
Assuming that these NOS-defined neurons are specified locally, these data reveal a novel neurogenic region in the echinopluteus that, temporally, develops somewhat independently from the larval nervous system.
Echinoids with nonfeeding larvae also lack the CB and the associated NS of the echinopluteus (Byrne et al.
The feeding larva of a sea urchin, called an echinopluteus, is recognized by its anteriorly directed, bilaterally symmetrical pairs of arms supported by calcitic skeletal rods and lined by a ciliated band used to swim and feed.
The location and cellular organization of the echinoid apical organ differs from that seen in dipleurula-type larvae, and this is likely due to evolution of the echinopluteus.