Echocardiography


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Wikipedia.

echocardiography

[‚ek·ō‚kärd·ē′äg·rə·fē]
(medicine)
A diagnostic technique for the heart that uses a transducer held against the chest to send high-frequency sound waves which pass harmlessly into the heart; as they strike structures within the heart, they are reflected back to the transducer and recorded on an oscilloscope.

Echocardiography

 

a method of examining the heart by means of ultrasound. Echocardiography is based on the recording of ultrasonic waves reflected from the surfaces of heart structures differing in density. Under normal conditions, curves are recorded successively from the walls of the aorta and left atrium, the anterior and posterior cusps of the mitral valve, the interventricular septum, and the posterior wall of the left ventricle.

Echocardiography is used to diagnose acquired and, to a lesser extent, congenital valvular diseases. It helps determine the condition of the cusps and the extent of narrowing of the valve openings; it identifies defects in the septa, large transposed blood vessels, and hypoplasia. Echocardiology is also used to diagnose pericarditis with effusion, tumors, and other abnormal conditions. The procedure is used to measure the volume, wall thickness, and mass of the muscular layer of the left ventricle; the stroke volume; and some other parameters of the blood circulation. By combining echocardiography and ultrasonic scanning one can obtain successive images of heart structures that reflect their dynamics during systole and diastole.

REFERENCE

Kardiologiia, 1974, no. 1, pp. 82–86; 1976, no. 6, pp. 15–25.

N. M. MUKHARLIAMOV

References in periodicals archive ?
The association between functional capacity and death due to cancer was calculated after adjusting for clinical characteristics and resting echocardiography.
I think this study will reach a wide cardiology and medical audience, where it will hopefully provide reassurance that echocardiography is not being overused, and will remind clinicians and patients that it is an important diagnostic tool to include in their medical evaluation," she says.
major vessel anterior to RVOT), additional VSD and PDA; which were evaluated on echocardiography, invasive angiocardiography and CT were compared to intraoperative findings.
The present case of mitral stenosis (MS) with giant LA where profuse, dense SEC masked the underlying thrombus in the LA cavity is being reported primarily to share the experience of such atypical clinical condition and to disseminate the limitation of echocardiography.
Clinically very difficult to distinguish, simple transthoracic echocardiography can delineate those lesions.
Hospitals that don't have cardiologists on staff to read echocardiography results refer them to UNICAR, Central America's most comprehensive cardiac centre which performs more than 700 open heart operations per year.
UM programs have typically focused on more invasive or costly interventions; programs addressing echocardiography have been less common.
It would be similarly unsuitable as a text for local University of Melbourne echocardiography courses.
Conclusion: Fetal echocardiography has high specificity, negative predictive values and accuracy and cases diagnosed as normal can reassure the parents about the normal cardiac status of the fetus.
Jason Freeman, MD, FACC, director of interventional cardiology at South Nassau, said, “Accreditation is a seal of approval that indicates the communities we serve can rely on us to use technologies and services in echocardiography that are recognized as effective and relevant by medical experts in the field.
Only 13% of the entire study population showed evidence of ischemia on stress echocardiography a low yield of positive findings for this expensive procedure, the authors noted.