Echovirus


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Wikipedia.

echovirus

[′ek·ō‚vī·rəs]
(virology)
Any member of the Picornaviridae family, genus Enterovirus; the name is derived from the group designation enteric cytopathogenic human orphan virus.

Echovirus

 

(acronym for enteric cytopathogenic human orphan virus), a minute virus containing one strand of RNA and lacking an outer protein layer. An orphan virus is a virus detected under laboratory conditions but not associated with any known disease. However, it has been found that this is not true of echovirus. Echovirus belongs to the genus Enterovirus of the family Picornavirus. Many of the more than 30 serotypes live in the human intestine without causing any symptoms of disease. Some, however, are the causative agents of aseptic meningitis, gastroenteritis, and respiratory diseases.

References in periodicals archive ?
In 2001 it accounted for 376 of 1,584 (24%) isolates reported to the CDC, marking a tremendous increase in echovirus 13 detections in this country.
As very few people have immunity to echovirus 13, it is believed it could spread even among adults in the future, the institute said.
In addition to test volume and sales projections, the report presents sales and market share estimates for major suppliers of Echovirus tests.
Successful treatment of echovirus meningoencephalitis and myositis-fasciitis with intravenous immune globulin therapy in a patient with X-linked agammaglobulinemia.
Because between 1970 and 2000 just 65 of 45,000 enterovirus isolates reported to the CDC were echovirus 13, the spectrum of disease associated with the virus is riot well established.
One reason that infants might get echovirus infections in organs that aren't affected in adults is that the [VLA-2] receptor might be expressed in fetal life or early newborn life and then get shut off," he suggests.
Public Health Labs In addition to test volume and sales projections, the report presents sales and market share estimates for major suppliers of Echovirus tests.
Coxsackie B virus, echovirus, and adenovirus were long considered the most common causes of myocarditis.
Seroneutralization of CPE on cell culture allows the identification of seven echovirus serotypes (E-4, E-6, E-13, E-11, E-25, and E-33).
Causes of rhabdomyolysis are numerous, including genetic disorders of metabolism, high fever, trauma, rheumatologic disorders, thyroid disorders, hypophosphatemia, alcohol or illicit drug use, and infections, most notably influenza virus types A and B, cytomegalovirus, echovirus, coxsackievirus, toxoplasmosis, Legionella species, Francisella tularensis, Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, and known HIV-1 infection.
double dagger]) Echovirus 9 (n = 3); echovirus 27 (n = 2); echovirus 30 (1).