Ecloga

Ecloga

 

a brief code of Byzantine law, promulgated by Emperor Leo III the Isaurian in the year 726. The Écloga was a revision of parts of the codification of Justinian, the Rural Code, and other acts promulgated by Byzantine emperors. It was drawn up in order to make the legislation less cumbersome and more comprehensible to the people of Byzantium. It dealt mainly with liability, the family, inheritance, and norms of criminal and procedural law. Although it provided for slavery as before, it reflected a more advanced stage of feudal relations; in particular, the procedure for liberating slaves was simplified. The Ecloga influenced several legislative works of the Slavic peoples.

References in periodicals archive ?
Ek het Vergilius se eerste Ecloga vir my vertaling gekies aangesien dit as 'n baie relevante gedig in die huidige Suid-Afrikaanse konteks beskou kan word.
2) Michele Feo ha studiato l'influenza del sogno di Cerere nel De raptu Proserpinae di Claudiano sulla decima ecloga di Petrarca.
In so doing, Barclay bypassed the tradition of medieval, Christian-allegorical, other-worldly pastoral that was still well known in the form of the Ecloga Theoduli, for example -- current as a school-text well into the sixteenth century -- in favor of a return to the political currency and topicality of the Vergilian example.
33) This work seems to have been closely related to an anonymous Accessus ad auctores dating from the late eleventh century and an allegorical commentary on the Ecloga of Theodulus by Bernard of Utrecht that was probably written before 1099.
52) Si tratta del celebre "qui amant ipsi sibi somnia fingunt" su cui si chiude l'ottava ecloga virgiliana (Buc.
La prima ecloga di Francesco Arsochi e un'imitazione di Giovan Francesco Suardi.
This schizophrenic vision of human love, denied any freedom and justice, is also played out at a psychological level in terms of Jung's pairs of archetypes (conscious and unconscious, persona and shadow, self and anima), reflecting the divided self that seems to have always been present in Portuguese love literature, from the girls yearning for their missing boyfriends in the cantigas de amigo to the maidens lamenting their missing knights in Bernardim Ribeiro's Menina e Moca and the shepherds torn from their lovers in his Eclogas.