Eclogue


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Eclogue

 

a type of idyll. An eclogue is a genre scene, usually a love scene, of conventional pastoral life. It may be written in narrative or dramatic form. In classical literature no distinction was made between the idyll, for example, those of Theocritus, and the eclogue, for example, Vergil’s Bucolics. Writers of the 18th-century classical school considered that the idyll required more emotion, and the eclogue more action; such were the first Russian eclogues, by A. P. Sumarokov. However, the distinction was not strictly observed. The genre had become obsolete by the early 19th century.

References in periodicals archive ?
The avenging genius of Africa is a staple of early abolitionist poems: he/she appears in the anonymously written Jamaica; A Poem (1777), "clank[ing] his chains, / And damn[ing] the race that robs his native plains"; in the 1788 version of "The Lovers: An African Eclogue," by Rushton's friend Hugh Mulligan: "Afric's Genius mourn'd an injur'd land, / And wrapt in clouds, her foe's destruction plann'd," and further "sees the wild, the dread tornado driven / By all th'avenging ministers of Heav'n.
4) For Eclogue 3 as agonistic poetry, see Karanika 2006.
This praise of buildings on the banks of a river is also found in Garcilaso's second Eclogue.
While his primary intentions with the tombeau may well have been to place himself at the head of an established Lyonnais coterie rather than to slight his fellow poets, this editorial move appears, all the same, to have been an effort by Sceve to eclipse his contemporaries, particularly the innovator of the eclogue in French (Hulubei 250).
4) The relationship is described in the prose introduction to the eclogue which states: "Y aquel que Juan se llamava entro primero .
Virgil's Eclogue II is also present in the catalogue of all the possessions the affectionate shepherd says he would share with his beloved if he were willing to live with him and to be his love:
9) The first and ninth poems share the theme of land confiscations, the second and eighth contain love songs, the third and seventh contain amoebaean singing contests and Poems 4 and 6 are paired because these poems are comparatively less pastoral in that they are about cosmological themes and are not sung by shepherds (the singer in Eclogue 4 is not determined and the largest part of Eclogue 6 is sung by the mythological Silenus).
Eclogue 4 commences with an invocation of Theocritus's Sicilian Muses (Sicelides Musae, paulo maiora canamus) and the announcement of a less bucolic register (non omnis arbusta iuvant humilesque myricae; / si canimus silvas, silvae sint consule dignae, 2-3).
He later explains that the popularity of the pastoral novel in early modern Spain can be attributed to the mystery of the characters' identity: "Disguise, in the eclogue especially, is a key to pastoral's effectiveness since the varied forms of the genre have been used for historical, political, and social revision as well as for essential love and friendship thematic" (3).
In addition,' Mr MacNeice contributes an eclogue between two tourists .
Toward the end he notes that "those [quatrains] selected are strung into something of an Eclogue, with perhaps a less than equal proportion of the 'Drink and make-merry' which (genuine or not) recurs over-frequently in the Original" (Rubaiyat, p.
Griffiths finds new meaning in Skelton's influence on Spenser's native style by describing Colin Clout's breaking of his pipe at the close of the December eclogue as a distinctly Skeltonic moment.