Eclogue


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Eclogue

 

a type of idyll. An eclogue is a genre scene, usually a love scene, of conventional pastoral life. It may be written in narrative or dramatic form. In classical literature no distinction was made between the idyll, for example, those of Theocritus, and the eclogue, for example, Vergil’s Bucolics. Writers of the 18th-century classical school considered that the idyll required more emotion, and the eclogue more action; such were the first Russian eclogues, by A. P. Sumarokov. However, the distinction was not strictly observed. The genre had become obsolete by the early 19th century.

References in periodicals archive ?
This eclogue, of course, is a song that he sings and thus a reading of the landscape that he fashions just as he imagines it is fashioning him.
He goes on to consider such topics as text and context, unity and ambiguity, style and content, and Virgil's Eclogues.
Spatial pastoral discourse, founded on Theocritus's Idylls and Virgil's Eclogues, opposes the idealized rural against the corrupt urban within a retreat-return structure (Gifford 2).
In their eagerness to extract the scandalously unfashionable political opinions uttered by "Robert Frost," the poet's critics seem reluctant to acknowledge that "Build Soil" is a dialogue between "Tityrus" and "Meliboeus," figures borrowed from the first of Virgil's Eclogues.
2) The name of the river recalls Callimachus' statement about poetry and Vergil's restatement of that same credo in Eclogue 6.
Each tale includes a preamble and a moralizing proverb, and each day opens with a description of the storytellers and concludes with the recitation of an eclogue.
Toward the end he notes that "those [quatrains] selected are strung into something of an Eclogue, with perhaps a less than equal proportion of the 'Drink and make-merry' which (genuine or not) recurs over-frequently in the Original" (Rubaiyat, p.
Griffiths finds new meaning in Skelton's influence on Spenser's native style by describing Colin Clout's breaking of his pipe at the close of the December eclogue as a distinctly Skeltonic moment.
Ophelia's retreat from the world might be compared to Colin Clout's in the opening eclogue of Spenser's Shepheardes Calendar, though hers is much less sudden: Colin abruptly casts his pan-pipe to the ground out of frustration with the inability of his art to change the world (i.
In fact, both poems (as does Heaney's "Bann Valley Eclogue" too), echo Virgil's fourth eclogue, written in celebration of new life, pressing phrases of hope into a somewhat grim-looking picture of the future (for Virgil it was the dissolution of the Republic).
Midwest Eclogue depicts nature as abundant and wild, exceeding our powers of observation and description.
His Speech to the Gathering of the Saints popularised the notion that Virgil's Fourth Eclogue actually prophesied the Messiah, encouraging the view of this poet as "a naturally Christian soul" ("anima naturaliter Christiana") and a story that St Paul paid a respectful visit to his tomb.