École des Beaux-Arts

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École des Beaux-Arts

(ākôl` dā bōzär`)[Fr.,=school of fine arts], French national school of fine arts, on the Quai Malaquais, Paris, founded in 1648 by Charles Le BrunLe Brun, Charles
, 1619–90, French painter, decorator, and architect. He studied with Vouet and in Rome. Strongly influenced by Poussin, he returned in 1646 to Paris, where he gradually developed a more decorative form of classicism.
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 with the consent of Cardinal Mazarin as the Académie de peinture et de sculpture; the title was changed in 1793, when it merged with the Académie d'architecture, founded in 1671 by Jean Baptiste ColbertColbert, Jean Baptiste
, 1619–83, French statesman. The son of a draper, he was trained in business and was hired by Cardinal Mazarin to look after his financial affairs.
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. It includes departments of painting, graphic arts, and sculpture and is free to artists whose previous training enables them to pass the entrance examinations. Architecture was taught at the school until 1968. Students are prepared in the various courses to compete for the Prix de RomePrix de Rome, Grand
, prize awarded annually by the French government, through competitive examination, to students of the fine arts. It entitles them to four years' study at the Académie de France à Rome.
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, which provides admission to the Académie de France à Rome. Besides its extensive collection of plaster casts of antiquities, the École is known for its superb collection of old-master drawings and for its exhibitions.

Beaux-Arts, École des:

see École des Beaux-ArtsÉcole des Beaux-Arts
[Fr.,=school of fine arts], French national school of fine arts, on the Quai Malaquais, Paris, founded in 1648 by Charles Le Brun with the consent of Cardinal Mazarin as the Académie de peinture et de sculpture; the title was changed in 1793,
..... Click the link for more information.
.

École des Beaux-Arts

A school founded in 1648 in Paris to teach painting and sculpture, literally the “School of Fine Arts”; architecture was added to the studies in 1819, emphasizing the study of Classical Greek and Roman buildings; the students were grouped in ateliers supervised by a master. Richard Morris Hunt was one of the first Americans to study at the school, followed by many other late nineteenth-century and early twentieth-century architects.

École des Beaux-Arts

The school in Paris that taught elaborate, historic, and eclectic architecture, designed on a monumental scale, based on classical architecture of Hellenic Greece and Imperial Rome, that adapted features of French architecture of the 16th, 17th, and 18th centuries; became a State institution in 1863 and still is the center of the teaching of architecture in France. Also see Beaux-Arts style.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the spring of 1890, Mary Cassatt made multiple visits to the Ecole des Beaux-Arts in Paris to see an exhibition of Japanese prints by Ukiyo-e masters: Hokusai, Hiroshige, Utamaro and others.
He studied architecture at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts and was called up in 1940.
Indeed, to prepare himself for the task, he staged a "revolution on a few elephant folio sheets of paper," as his compatriot Eugene-Emmanuel Viollet-le-Duc described the heterodox reimaginings of ancient structures Labrouste produced while still a student at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts.
For the Salon of 1880, another portrait, that of une jeune flue en fleurs (appropriately outside the window of a florist's shop) was selected; a special success, since the display was chosen by the senior members of the Ecole des Beaux-Arts, who were wary of such modernists as Renoir.
Tripa studied design at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts in Paris She worked on an international platform in make-up styling and photography for advertising and film productions--involving travel between Zurich and London as well as Paris and Los Angeles, where she lived and worked with celebrities for more than 15 years.
The name Beaux Arts, meaning "fine arts," comes from the Ecole des Beaux-Arts in Paris, where most of these architects studied.
The Van Alen Institute, which was founded in 1894, was originally called the Beaux Arts Society, since it was made up of a small group of alumni of the school, Ecole des Beaux-Arts.
He was accepted at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts to study painting and representational art, financing himself by commercial calligraphy for Arab magazines.
Miss Morgan was a woman of firsts: one of the first women to graduate with a degree in civil engineering from the University of California; the first woman diplomee in architecture from the Ecole des Beaux-Arts in Paris; the first woman architect to be licensed in California.
Born in Dublin in 1853, O'Kelly moved to London at a young age and in 1874 he became one of the first Irish artists to study at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts in Paris.
In larger projects, particularly masterplans, the manner of composing and articulating buildings still reveals itself as emanating from the Ecole des Beaux-Arts to which many key American architects were sent in the early twentieth century.
Because the Ecole des Beaux-Arts did not admit women, she studied with individual artists and was drawn to the group derisively called the "impressionists" (23).
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