Economic Commission for Latin America


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Economic Commission for Latin America

 

(ECLA), a regional body established in 1948 by the Economic and Social Council of the United Nations. The Latin American states, the USA, Great Britain, France, the Netherlands, Canada, and Spain are members of the ECLA. The purposes of the ECLA are the development and implementation of measures that promote the economic development of the Latin American states and strengthen economic cooperation both among the Latin American countries and between those countries and states on other continents. For these purposes, ECLA conducts studies of economic, social, and technical problems; collects, summarizes, and disseminates information and statistics on such problems; and offers advice and makes recommendations to its members on matters falling within its competence.

The highest organ of ECLA is the plenary session, which is held every two years. Between sessions, a committee meets periodically to review the commission’s work and prepare the ECLA report for the Economic and Social Council. The permanent executive organ is the Secretariat, which is located in Santiago, Chile. It has subsidiary offices in Mexico City; Washington, D.C.; Rio de Janeiro; Montevideo; Bogotá; and Port-of–Spain.

Various subsidiary bodies operate within the framework of ECLA. They include the Central American Economic Cooperation Committee, the Trade Committee, and the High-level Governmental Committee on the Regional Evaluation of the International Development Strategy. The Latin American Institute for Economic and Social Planning and the Regional Center for Demographic Training and Research in Latin America operate under the aegis of ECLA.

References in periodicals archive ?
Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean, ECLAC, (1999) states that FDI has become one of the most important components in the globalization process of the international economy, and describes how a combination of factors determine where FDI flows to.
1) United Nations Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean, Statistical Yearbook for Latin America and the Caribbean, 2004 (Santiago, Chile: United Nations, 2005), 196.
Uruguay has the most equitable income distribution in Latin America, according to the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean, which attributes this achievement to the dedication of public funds to retirement and pensions, and an infrastructure of social services accessible to all citizens.
He has also been a consultant to the International Monetary Fund, the Inter-American Development Bank, the World Bank and the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean.
We cannot allow Latin American and Caribbean women to keep dying due to the mere fact that they are women, the Executive Secretary of the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC), Alicia BEircena, said on Tuesday on the eve of the commemoration of the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women.
According to the UN's Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC), 40 years from now the number of Latin Americans over 60 years old will have tripled to almost 200 million.
According to the Economic Survey of Latin America and the Caribbean 2015 published recently by the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC), the region's currencies have tended to weaken against the U.
However, the businesspeople on our list will likely face challenges in the foreseeable future as Latin America faces economic headwinds, with the price of oil falling to record lows, and foreign direct investment throughout the region dropping 16 percent last year, according to the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean.
Hugo Ventura, Head of Energy and Natural Resources at the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC), said that energy imports for some countries "is a lifesaver" and could be kept up in the future if the conditions are not met to encourage more investment in energy or there are delays in some major projects.
Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC), nearly 9 percent of all exports from Latin America and the Caribbean were headed for China in 2011; almost 14 percent of all imports for the region were from China.
A report from the UN s Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (CEPAL) forecast heavy economic losses due to climate change in Central America.
The region's largest trading partner currently is the European Union, but China is poised to be Latin America's second largest trade partner by 2015, according to the United Nation's Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC), based in Santiago, Chile.

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