ecotone

(redirected from Ecotones)
Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Wikipedia.

ecotone

[′ek·ə‚tōn]
(ecology)
A zone of intergradation between ecological communities.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Today as well as in the past, changes in precipitation regimes are likely to affect the extension of rainforests mainly along the ecotones and where there are steep moisture gradients.
In order to improve the water quality of the reservoir, ecotones will be constructed using vegetation derived from the surrounding habitats in the region.
1981) observed Northern Prairie Skinks along ecotones of woodlands and grasslands.
Once in the estuary, bay, lagoon or bayou, there are more subtle but equally important edge effects around ecotones.
Herpetofauna diversity and microenvironment correlates across a pasture-edge-interior ecotone in tropical rainforest fragments in the Los Tuxtlas Biosphere Reserve of Veracruz, Mexico.
After months of pilot testing, the Ecotones Duet units are now available to patients during their hospital stay without charge, through the Guest Services Concierge Program.
Based on limited observations in Florida, these two species can occur in close proximity, but are separated by distinct ecotones based on slight changes (< 1.
ricinus varied not only between host species, but also between sampling sites and was highest in ecotones (Kintai and Kaunas Botanical Garden Park) where adult ticks and other I.
Avian nest dispersion and fledgling success in field-forest ecotones.
Additionally, in transition ecotones, availability of food energy is limited throughout the year, resulting in somatic growth and reproductive activity being separated in time (Paulet & Boucher 1991, Duinker 2002, Thompson & MacDonald 2006).
These include 1) development of new ecotones related to expansion of southern animal species, such as deer, red fox, and domestic livestock; 2) altered routes and timing of migration for wild birds and caribou herds; 3) habitat alteration and fragmentation due to resource extraction and development; and 4) historical and ongoing translocation of hosts and pathogens (e.
Migration of herbaceous plant species across ancient-recent forest ecotones in central Belgium.