ectotherm

(redirected from Ectotherms)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal.

ectotherm

[′ek·tə‚thərm]
(physiology)
An animal that obtains most of its heat from the environment and therefore has a body temperature very close to that of its environment.
References in periodicals archive ?
Recent studies have revealed that not only temperature means but also temperature fluctuations have great influence in egg development and hatchling phenotypes in ectotherms (Du & Shine 2010; Micheli-Campbell et al.
The behavior of ectotherms challenges the predicted shifts in species distribution patterns; thus, knowledge concerning these unpredicted behaviors shows us that animals such as marine snails, in this case, still have a lot to teach us concerning global warming and climate change models.
infinity]] of John's Snapper with distance from the equator is explained in theories of variation in body size of ectotherms in relation to geography (James's rule; Blackburn et al.
A key aim is to integrate life-history theory and respiration physiology to understand and predict the ecological consequences of temperature, through its effect on metabolism, growth, reproduction and survival in aquatic ectotherms.
If the latter is true, it implies that for about half the time since the mammalian lineage split from the reptile/bird lineage, the early proto-mammals did not have chromosomally based sex determination and were probably ectotherms.
However, the study of ectothermic vertebrates might provide a fruitful alternative for such studies, providing a system where one can potentially separate the consequences of altering metabolism and body temperature, since these two functions are not as intricately intertwined in ectotherms as they are in endotherms.
In North America, WNV infections in ectotherms were first reported in 2001 (19).
Sea-surface temperature was expected to influence the distribution of sea turtles because they are ectotherms, and research has shown a relationship between temperature gradients and aggregation of sea turtles and swordfish (Bigelow et al.
Thermal properties of retreat sites and perching sites are important, particularly for ectotherms, because of the effect of temperature on physiology (Huey, 1991).
Tropical species are affected more by the very narrow temperature range of their typically warm climate than are ectotherms living where the temperatures fluctuate in greater degrees.
The mass specific standard respiration rate (MSR) is a measure of the intensity of basal aerobic metabolism and is primarily controlled by the habitat temperature in ectotherms.
Arboviruses have been reported to affect ectotherms, and in some cases ectotherms are thought to serve as a reservoir (1-4).