Eglah

Eglah

(ĕg`lə), in the Bible, one of David's wives.
References in periodicals archive ?
When murder became widespread, the rite of the eglah arufah (breaking the neck of a heifer) ceased; and when adultery increased, the sotah (bitter waters) ordeal was discontinued (Mishnah Sotah 9:9).
However, if God permitted polygamy to stand as an example not to be followed, then one wonders why conflict among David's wives--Michal, Abigail, Ahinoam, Maacah, Haggith, Abital, Eglah, and Bathsheba--is not mentioned.
Similarly, regarding the ritual of the eglah arufah, a heifer slaughtered when a body is found in a field and the murderer is unknown, the Bible speaks of atonement for the people (Deut.
2) This rather strange pun is based on the idea that Joseph sent a signal to Jacob via the wagons that he was alive, by hinting at the last bit of Torah that they had studied together before their separation: the laws of the eglah arufah (the beheaded heifer), which appear in Deuteronomy, chapter 21.
What is the connection between the Joseph story and the laws of the eglah arufah?
One way of connecting the Joseph story and the eglah arufah is by noting that both deal with a body that is either dead (Deut.
By sending an eglah arufah, so to speak, to Jacob, Joseph is hinting that Jacob, like the elders, is not responsible for Joseph's death.
When Joseph sends the sign of the eglah arufah, he may be saying in essence: yes, I was sacrificed, but unlike the real eglah arufah, I am alive.