Ekaterinoslav


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Related to Ekaterinoslav: Dnipropetrovs'k, Dnjepropetrovsk

Ekaterinoslav

 

the former name of Dnepropetrovsk (until 1926), the administrative center of Dnepropetrovsk Ob-last, Ukrainian SSR.

References in periodicals archive ?
In August we travelled with father and mother to Ekaterinoslav (a city named after Catherine the Great) in a covered wagon, for there was no railroad connection.
This link I found in my dear wife, Margarete, born Toews, in Ekaterinoslav.
Several months later, in 1895, some Belgian companies came to Ekaterinoslav intending to found workshops in Russia.
And it was in this role that he was able not only to influence the planning of Moscow after the Great Fire of 1812, but also to transform the character of most major cities in the Russian empire, from Kiev, Vilnius and Smolensk in the west, Ekaterinoslav in the south, Krasnoyarsk, Tomsk and Omsk in the Siberian east, and Onega on the White Sea coast in the north.
Lindner's essay in Grazhdanskaia identichnost' emphasizes the enduring presence of government control even as Ekaterinoslav, buoyed by the economic development of the surrounding region, turned into a vital, dynamic city in the late imperial period; censorship, for example, prevented the city's newspapers and journals from becoming real outlets for public opinion, he claims.
Rainer Lindner's article in the same book points to the small but highly influential entrepreneurial elite of Ekaterinoslav.
Petersburg and the Pale of Settlement to Ekaterinoslav and Perm', Russians used voluntary associations to create new forms of socialization and horizontal social networks, thereby developing, in Bradley's favorite phrase, "society's capacity to talk to itself" (233).
Petersburg in 1911; the other two were written in Ekaterinoslav in 1914 and 1918, respectively.
Petersburg], fond 361, opis' 1, delo 21 has programs for concerts given June 22, in Ekaterinoslav (list 44 ob.
Thus workers Ekaterinoslav in 1883 and Iuzovka in 1892 engaged in violent pogroms against Jews.
On the other hand, despite all the obstacles revolutionaries did enjoy organizational success, which was capped by the impressive general strikes in Ekaterinoslav and other southern cities in 1903.
The evidence he quotes suggests that, in October 1905 at least, the pogromists were outraged by what they took to be insults to deeply held convictions about the place of Tsar and Orthodoxy in the world: radical celebration of the humiliation of the Tsar, together with rumors about mockery of the Church, were the proximate cause of the pogrom, in Ekaterinoslav as elsewhere in the Russian empire.