flexion

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flexion

[′flek·shən]
(biology)
Act of bending, especially of a joint.
References in periodicals archive ?
MVC: As explained previously, MVC was measured at 90[degrees] elbow flexion using strain gauge.
Optimal positioning of the models on the equipment required approximately 90[degrees] of shoulder flexion with slight elbow flexion that resulted in the hands finally being just higher than the elbows for all anthropometric cases.
Motion analysis trials were initially performed for the motions of simultaneous elbow flexion and hand open, elbow extension and hand close, elbow flexion and hand close, and elbow extension and hand open as per Miller et al.
The independent variables and the levels of each were as follows: (a) personality type (TYPE; A and B); (b) elbow flexion torque (TORQUE; isometric trials - 20%, 40%, 60%, and 80% of maximum isometric flexion torque; isokinetic trials - 20% and 40% of maximum isometric flexion torque; isoacceleration trials - 20% and 40% of maximum isometric flexion torque); (c) elbow flexion velocity (VEL; 0[degrees]/s and 50 [degrees]/s); and (d) elbow flexion acceleration (ACC; 0 [degrees]/s/s and 50 [degrees]/s/s).
Firstly the rate of elbow flexion during the draw phase of the stroke cycle appears non-linear.
The elbow flexion test--a provocative maneuver in which the patient flexes the elbow as far as possible and reports any tingling or numbness of the hand--should be included in the work-up.
The control system is set so that a reasonable cable tension generates an equilibrium signal with the forearm and gripper at about 90[degrees] of elbow flexion.
Kwan (9) stated that, due to the unique articular relationship of the elbow, the resultant force acting on distal humerus is the function of the degree of elbow flexion and the direction of applied force.
The required excursion of the prosthesis may be reduced to accommodate the limited excursion of the user by movement of the elbow flexion attachment or the inclusion of an excursion amplifier.
Strength testing reveals weakness in forearm supination and elbow flexion, but strength testing is rarely reliable acutely secondary to pain.
Since TB is an elbow extensor, it may seem counterintuitive to observe TB activity here, but progressive elbow flexion during the draw phase is actively resisted through an eccentric action of TB.