Election Day


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Election Day

Tuesday following the first Monday in November
Election Day, the day on which Americans vote for their elected officials, is held on the Tuesday after the first Monday in November. Americans vote for their president and vice president every four years on that Tuesday. They vote for their U.S. representatives every two years during even-numbered years, and they vote for their U.S. senators every six years—one-third of the U.S. senators are up for reelection every two years. Americans also vote for their state senators, state representatives, and many local officials on this day.
This date was set by Congress in 1845 to correct abuses caused by having allowed each state to appoint its electors any time before the date in December set for their convening. At that time, the nation was primarily rural, so Election Day was set for late fall, after the harvest would be brought in. At that time, many people would have to travel on foot to their courthouse or county seat to cast their vote, which could take a full day. So Election Day was set on a Tuesday to avoid conflict with Sunday church services.
To encourage people to vote, ten states now consider Election Day a legal holiday, and five additional states require employers to give their employees several hours off to allow them to vote. In other states, some employers give their employees the day off. Even so, millions of Americans do not take advantage of what may be their most valuable privilege.
CONTACTS:
Federal Election Commission
999 E. St. N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20463
800-424-9530 or 202-694-1100; fax: 202-219-8504
www.fec.gov
SOURCES:
AmerBkDays-2000, p. 752
AnnivHol-2000, p. 199
DictDays-1988, p. 36
PatHols-2006, p. 83
References in periodicals archive ?
Many viral news stories were spread aimed at propagating negative false claims about Hillary Clinton on Facebook and Twitter, in the months leading up to Election Day.
On election day, observers will monitor the opening of polling stations, voting, the counting of ballots and the tabulation of results.
There will be incalculable twists and turns between now and on election day.
The chair - who once used his tiny office as a polling location - figured no one else would want to show up on election day.
The chairman of the poll body's steering committee for the 2016 elections is also convinced that power won't be a problem come election day, citing their experience in the 2013 elections.
The law permits the early opening of a polling site in each community 10 days before Election Day, but leaves it up to cities and towns whether to open the polling site on weekends before election day.
Although election day precipitation has roughly the same effect on voters from different parties, it depresses turnout more in less densely populated areas.
The suspension of mobile service on the Election Day will halt masses from inquiring about their constituencies and details of polling stations by sending an SMS on 8300 through E-ticket service launched by the ECP recently.
To ensure foolproof security on Election Day, heavy contingent of Elite forces has been sought which would be deployed on all entry and exit points to avert any untoward incident.
Romney is set to make two campaign stops on Election Day in the battleground state of Ohio, whose 18 electoral votes are seen as potentially crucial in determining the winner of the election.
The strategy aims to free up campaign workers and volunteers on election day to focus on a smaller number of potential supporters and make sure they get to the polls.
Mews's shop had become "a sort of rendezvous" for outport voters, and with Morris's permission, Mews issued 496 notes that the recipients exchanged for free railway tickets (292 of them return tickets) at the railway station, thanks to the co-operation of the General Manager of the Newfoundland Railway Company, Thomas Noble, who laid on extra trains before and on election day.