electrical noise


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electrical noise

[i′lek·trə·kəl ′nȯiz]
(electricity)
Noise generated by electrical devices, for example, motors, engine ignition, power lines, and so on, and propagated to the receiving antenna direct from the noise source.
References in periodicals archive ?
Now why would one buy an overpriced memory card just because it is said to offer lesser electrical noise interferences without viable proof?
To fix this, a sub-wire harness (filter) will be installed to minimise electrical noise from the other electrical components," said Williams.
They feature 40 to 80[degrees]C operation, electrical noise immunity and surge protection.
The one piece stainless steel pressure cavity has no 0-rings or organic media and its IP67 packaging design provides water resistance to 1m with a higher resistance against hydraulic shock and upgraded electronics that ensure signal integrity against electrical noise.
Radio Frequency (RF) expertise is required to optimize the electrical layout and connections of the silicon tuner to avoid causing internal electrical noise that may effect RF reception.
A robust high temperature accelerometer sensor has a removable magnetic mounting base for attachment of a stinger and is internally protected against thermal shock, electrical noise and amplitude overload.
Greg Dietz, Belden's networking cable product manager, adds, "Belden bonded-pair cables can provide additional peace of mind when deployed in mission-critical data centres, networks having frequent moves, adds and changes, and networks in which electrical noise and interference are high.
This reference design demonstrates how digital-power techniques, when applied to UPS applications, enable easy modifications through software, the use of smaller magnetics, intelligent battery charging, higher efficiency, compact designs, lower audible and electrical noise via a purer sine-wave output, USB communication, and a lower overall bill-of-materials cost.
Amplifiers designed for old analogue reception often generate considerable electrical noise, which is bad news for digital signals, so would need replacing with amplifiers designed for the digital age.
Shielded from extreme conditions in temperature, contaminants, moisture, vibration, and radiated or emitted electrical noise, ruggedized enclosures ensure that critical computing applications operate reliably, with minimum repairs and downtime.
The torque and speed digital signal outputs minimise the risk of signals being corrupted by electrical noise from other parts of the rig.
The Luxtron One fiber optic temperature measurement device is suited for harsh chemical and high electrical noise environments.

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