electron radius

electron radius

[i′lek‚trän ′rād·ē·əs]
(physics)
The classical value r of 2.8179403 × 10-13 centimeter for the radius of an electron; obtained by equating mc 2 for the electron to e 2/ r, where e and m are the charge and mass of the electron respectively; any classical model for an electron will have approximately this radius.
References in periodicals archive ?
This, besides agreeing with the classical electron radius as well as with the canonical momentum of a charged particle in an external field, in the sense that P = e[A.
corresponds with the classical electron radius, approximately [10.
It is customary that a single element of such a tube is an element with the size of a classical electron radius [r.
contour defined as a proportion of the speed of light and electron radius as:
As was found [2], the radius of the star is much smaller than the classical electron radius, still the smallest radius down to which the photon oscillations are being counted might be of the order or even larger than the classical radius [r.
In classical physics the idea that the electron radius r0 is purely electromagnetic leads to the calculation
The smallest elliptic radius is a little bit greater than the classical electron radius itself:
40] which relates the Universe radius with classical electron radius.
The Lorentz invariance of the electron radius can be formally satisfied, in the case where this radius is allowed to shrink to that of a point charge.
This is probably more plausible as an electron radius, and it is to one's surprise, exactly the same as that for the proton as we found from the hydrogen nucleus in the previous paragraph.
Electrodynamics arises as a kinematical effect and the nuclear force as a particular form at a distance equal to the classical electron radius.
Expressions for the classical electron radius and some of the Large Number Coincidences are derived.

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