Eliphaz


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Eliphaz

(ĕl`ĭfăz, ēlī`–), in the Bible. 1 Son of Esau and father of Teman. 2 Temanite, a comforter of Job.
References in periodicals archive ?
He explicitly connects Job with Aristotle, Eliphaz with the Torah, Bildad with the Mu'tazila, and Zophar with the Ash'ariyya.
I don't like Eliphaz very much in the book of Job, partly because he treats Job so poorly and partly because what he says, for the main part, is so true.
God judges the theological correctness of the friends and, speaking to Eliphaz, declares: "My wrath is kindled against you and against your two friends; for you have not spoken of me what is right, as my servant Job has" (Job 42:7).
But Eliphaz says, "He wounds, but he binds up; he strikes, but his hands heal" (Job 5.
Job's three friends, Bildad, Eliphaz, and Zophar, on the psychology
Similarly, Radak explains that in I Chronicles 1:36, Timna is listed as if she was the child of Eliphaz, while in actuality she was his concubine, again for the sake of brevity.
As if the emblem were not dense enough, the woman is also a type of Job, faced by three venerable men in robes and turbans (standing for Eliphaz, Bildar, and Zophar), who seem to be offering consolation; she replies, in the poem's opening line, "Urge me no more.
Eliphaz starts his misrepresentation of Job with a mystical vision.
I have half a mind (but this in deepest secrecy) to start when I come there, if the ground promise well, and deliver a Dozen of Lectures, in my own Annandale accent, with my own God-created brain and heart, to such audience as will gather round me, on some section or aspect of this strange Life in this strange Era; on which my soul like Eliphaz the Temanite's is getting fuller and fuller [Job 4:2-3].
It is worth noting that most Southern Arava kibbutzim (Ketura, Yotvata, Lotan, Grofit, Eliphaz, and Neve Harif) where conditions for solar electricity production are optimal, have already entered into agreements with Arava Power, and together they will fulfill the vision of transforming the region into Israel's "silicon valley of renewable energy.
Eliphaz accuses Job, saying, "You have exacted pledges of your brothers for nothing, and stripped the naked of their clothing" (Job 22:6).
The play itself is less about the characters than the broad idea of the struggle with faith, the temptation to believe, as Eliphaz insists to the destitute and now-childless Job, that "no one suffers who is innocent.