Emerson

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Emerson

Ralph Waldo. . 1803--82, US poet, essayist, and transcendentalist
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We can, in this way, begin to conceive how Emersonian optimism functions: an orientation toward the symptoms of an imperfect and incomplete reality is what allows one to enjoy shamelessly--for, in Emerson's view, Reason is the hidden cause of these glorious perforations in the world.
Mailer had given up his Emersonian illusions about originality and self-reinvention.
In the first part of the paper, I examine Stanley Cavell's suggestion put forward in his Carus Lectures of 1988 that Beckett's play can be read as a work which embodies and develops the idea of Emersonian moral perfectionism (1990, 3).
Emersonian Transcendentalism certainly emerged out of the tradition of New England Puritan Christianity by way of Unitarianism, and the Nashville Agrarians also embraced a strong fundamentalist Protestant/ Christian ethic.
Exhibiting Price's personal taxonomies of the physical world across varied stages of his career and different modes of production, all three shows produced that most Emersonian of reactions: delight.
While responsive to the Emersonian call to slough off the past, Hawthorne .
stereotypes of Emerson as a self-created Romantic visionary who rejected the past," I disagree that Emersonian self-reliance is "the most striking expression by an American of a historic international shift in the very structure of sentiment and feeling.
Levine and Malachuk structure their collection around a historical division between four "Classics on Emerson's Politics" that treat public life as an implicit rather than explicit topic of Emerson's work, and nine original essays that make the case for seeing Emersonian self-reliance as intentionally political.
He opens Truth's Ragged Edge, his copious literary history, claiming that the American novel from the early Republic to the 1870s "both reflected and helped make possible the movement toward free will, and then Emersonian self-consciousness and self-reliance," becoming in the process a vehicle for authors' "theological and philosophical positions.
We conclude this preamble by suggesting it makes sense to refer to a specifically Emersonian form of pragmatism that is directly connected with his particular claims regarding the role reading plays in the lives of healthy individuals and by extension in a healthy society.
A while back, 1 wrote on the notion of hedging one's citizenship and Emersonian self-reliance in response to the policy, and political disorder that seemingly continues to surround us.