Enantiornithines

Enantiornithines

[i‚nan·tē′ȯrn·ə‚thēnz]
(vertebrate zoology)
Opposite birds, so called because their foot bones fuse in the opposite direction of modern birds, from the subclass Sauriuvae.
References in periodicals archive ?
Species recorded (Iberomesornis romerali, Eoalulavis hoyasi and Concornis lacustris) have interpreted as being perching enantiornithines of reduced size with enhanced flight capabilities, allowing low speed flight and good manoeuverability (Sanz et al, 2000, 2002; Ortega et al, 1999).
Scientists in north-east China dug up the remains of an unknown creature, which lived more than 124 million years ago and was part of the primitive bird group called enantiornithines.
The so-far unnamed creature, which lived between 124 million and 145 million years ago, belonged to an extinct group of primitive flying birds called the enantiornithines.