Encke Division

Encke Division

(enk -kĕ) (Encke Gap) See Saturn's rings.

Encke division

[′eŋ·kə də‚vizh·ən]
(astronomy)
A faint line that splits the outer ring of Saturn into two.
References in periodicals archive ?
Much narrower is the hairlike Encke Division barely inside the A ring's outer edge.
Similar brightness variations appear in the F-ring of Saturn and a pair of narrow rings in Saturn's Encke division.
There are signs of a "partial" ring in Voyager photos of the Saturn ring system's Encke division, Brahic notes.
Two moons, each several kilometers wide, orbit inside gaps in the outer A ring: Pan in the 320-km-wide Encke Division and Daphnis in the 35-km-wide Keeler Gap.
Just inside the A ring's outer edge is the extremely thin Encke Division or Keeler Gap (usage varies)--an extreme test for any telescope.
Since the Encke Division in Saturn's rings is a linear feature, some people think that it is easier to resolve.
The lunar-orbit-insertion-burn segment of the diagram showing how Apollo astronauts got to the Moon has problems, the Encke Division in Saturn's rings is mislabeled, an illustration of the Sun erroneously shows sunspots at its poles, the descriptions and illustrations of a reflector and a catadioptric telescope are incorrectly paired, the giant elliptical galaxy M87 is misidentified in several places as M82, and a diagram explaining the seasons is exactly backward.
In the sunlit view at right [5], the 325-km-wide (200-mile) Encke Division looks markedly different.
A second mechanism involves small moons embedded within gaps, such as the tiny moon Pan that clears out the Encke Division.
Seeing the Encke Division requires the three Es: excellent optics, excellent seeing, and excellent eyes.
At its outer edge is the extremely narrow Encke Division, which is almost never resolved separately.
Even though the rings were nearly edge on, I could make out the Cassini and Encke divisions.