Puritan

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Puritan

(in the late 16th and 17th centuries)
any of the more extreme English Protestants, most of whom were Calvinists, who wished to purify the Church of England of most of its ceremony and other aspects that they deemed to be Catholic
References in periodicals archive ?
The second section "considers an array of religious practices that in some way challenged English puritan conceptions of the body of Christ" (18).
English Puritans first turned to the theory of contract to protect their rights against royal absolutism.
From this political 'market', English Puritans believed that the Anglo-Saxon institutions representing the epitome of personal freedom and justice had spontaneously emerged.
The thought of the English Puritans, culminating in Milton, represented the most advanced development in the Reformation concept of freedom as it led to the establishment of freedom in America.
He draws extensively on recent scholarship on English Puritans and on the period of the Interregnum.
English Puritans saw America as the unspoilt land on which to build a new, pure society--the 'city on the hill' etc.
Focusing on English Puritans of the 16th century, German-born American historian Mosse (1918-99) explores the relationship that certain divines managed to construct between Reformation ideas and the new Renaissance political thought--the reason of state--as expounded most explicitly by Machiavelli.
The city was founded more than 350 years ago by English Puritans, but now boasts a diverse population that includes Irish, German, Jewish, Italian, African-American, Latino and Asian cultures.
However, the English Puritans are not just another case, but the one that Weber considered most important and most likely to support his theories.
John Owen, leading theologian among the English Puritans, has recently been attracting increasing scholarly interest.
THE ENGLISH PURITANS in 1603 had high hopes that the new Scottish king, James I, would push the Church of England nearer to Calvinism.
Among the finest examples of early Norman architecture in Britain, the church is reminiscent of the charming, unpretentious wooden churches English Puritans would later build in New England.