entomophagous

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entomophagous

[‚ent·ə′mäf·ə·gəs]
(zoology)
Feeding on insects.
References in periodicals archive ?
The book has a chapter (11) on research, development and future of entomophagy in different countries as well as perceptions on insects as an alternative food source.
In this section, Kofi Annan, the former secretary-general of the United Nations, says he believes entomophagy education will assist in people perceiving insects as a delicious food option.
Such dishes suggest the fundamental irony that informs contemporary entomophagy.
The thought of snacking on insects might make you squirm, but roughly 80 percent of the world's population practices entomophagy, or the eating of insects.
Entomophagy, or the eating of insects, is practiced in most parts of the world as a regular part of a diet because insects provide an important source of protein.
This practice, known as entomophagy (en-toh-MOFF-uh-jee), makes sense, she says, because insects tend to be quite nutritious.
The good news is that, entomophagy, the act of eating insects, has been practiced by humans since time immemorial and continues to be practiced by cultures worldwide as a dietary supplement and a form of medicine.
The contributors address such subjects as gender in American wild game cookbooks, entomophagy, and the many uses of cattails.
Entomophagy or the use of insects as food is analyzed by taking into account the nutritive importance that insects can offer to overcome both hanger and malnutrition in many parts of the world.
Entomophagy, however, is not commonly practiced in Sabah except by some rural and elderly people.
Aletheia Price is a California resident and lifelong homeschooler whose interests include entomophagy, web design and nonfiction writing.