Ephebeia

Ephebeia

 

in ancient Greece, a state institution organized to train freeborn youths between the ages of 18 and 20 for military and administrative service. The first year of training, which was devoted to sports and the acquisition of military skills, was carried out under camp conditions; the second year was taken up by garrison and other forms of guard duty. The ephebeia in Athens, in contrast to that in Sparta, offered instruction in literature, philosophy, and music. After completing his training in the ephebeia, a youth enjoyed all the rights and privileges of citizenship.

REFERENCE

Zhurakovskii, G. E. Ocherkipo istorii antichnoipedagogiki, 2nd ed. Moscow, 1963.
References in periodicals archive ?
Polinskaya (2003, 14n14) therefore distinguishes a broader notion of the ephebe from its association with the ephebeia institutionalized by Lycurgus in the second half of the fourth century BCE, defining ephebes in this sense "as an age-group, from the onset of puberty to twenty years of age when young men gained full access to citizenship rights.
Christ 2001:416-418), and the introduction of a more centralised and formal type of training, such as the Athenian ephebeia, aimed at providing specific training in [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (see Arist.
The spread of ephebic institutions throughout the Hellenistic world has puzzled scholars for a long time, since the ephebeia seems to have instilled in the young men the ideal of the traditional hoplite citizen, while the actual fighting was in the hands of mercenaries and other professional soldiers.
In Athens, the ephebeia provided a clear link with the glory days of the Classical age, and remained central to the education of well-born citizens.