equivalence

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equivalence

[i′kwiv·ə·ləns]
(mapping)
In an equal-area map projection, the property of having the ratio between areas on the map the same as the ratio between corresponding areas on the earth's surface.
(mathematics)
A logic operator having the property that if P, Q, R, etc., are statements, then the equivalence of P, Q, R, etc., is true if and only if all statements are true or all statements are false.
References in periodicals archive ?
From detailed video- or audiotape transcripts, response, researcher, and verbal equivalences should be assessed.
A number of statistical analyses assess equivalences in quantitative data (e.
The use of conditional discrimination abilities and procedures is fundamental to the equivalence literature, (e.
The widespread use of conditional discriminations in testing an individual's ability to form equivalence relations (e.
Equivalence relations are said to occur when a set of arbitrary conditional discriminations is trained and, as a consequence, a new set of untrained conditional relations emerges--specifically, reflexivity, symmetry, and transitivity relations (Sidman & Tailby, 1982).
This raises the issue of whether the emergence of equivalence relations is possible from the exclusive training of positive conditional relations.
In most studies of equivalence class formation, training and testing were conducted on an individual basis and with small numbers of participants per study.
Let F : D [right arrow] Top be a functor taking all morphisms to homotopy equivalences.
Equivalence between Chinese and English words is complex due to the fact that a single word in Chinese might have 3 to 5 other equivalent words in English, while in some cases a single English word might also have other several equivalences in Chinese.
Even though this is a problem of ordinary web we could suffer from the same problem if we do not assert equivalences in DLD ontology.
Equivalence classes refer to a set of stimuli that are functionally equal for the individual, despite having completely different physical properties.
Another finding from equivalence research is a phenomenon called 'transfer of function'.