Erastianism

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Erastianism

doctrine declaring state is superior to the church in ecclesiastical affairs (1524–1543). [Christian Hist.: EB, III: 937]
References in periodicals archive ?
The most sustained Anglican Erastian response to Stebbing came from William Warburton.
Jenkins determines that Jewel's focus on Erastian rhetoric over theology resulted in his failure to formulate a positive theology or a systematic hermeneutic for the Church Fathers, whom he employed haphazardly to bolster his arguments against the idea of a unified Catholic tradition in Rome.
552) Under the early Stuarts, however, Erastian theory shifted in the direction of the divine right of kings, in which the monarch was understood to have a divinely appointed prerogative to rule both church and state.
In 1841, however, the Jerusalem Bishopric controversy convinces Newman that it is the Anglican and not the Catholic Church that represents the real Erastian threat.
Parliamentary action was needed, but members of Parliament sitting in England had little understanding of Scottish resistance to Erastian assumptions, and less still of how far Scots were capable of going on points of principle.
Politically and morally speaking, Marshall was less a Radical than an erastian Whig.
The position was one of Erastian opposition to the claims of the bishops to secular power.
Instead of the clericalist Presbyterian church that the Covenanters had demanded be created in England, the final ecclesiastical settlement was, as the Scots divine Robert Baillie complained, `a lame, Erastian Presbytery' in which powers of jurisdiction were firmly in lay hands.
In his efforts to legitimate the Erastian supervision of a Tory church by a Whig government, Hoadly took the view that Christ had appointed no judges, either civil or ecclesiastical, over the consciences of his people.
Leninism was particularly intolerant of religious beliefs because of the stifling presence of an Erastian or state-dominated church in Russia.
Religion does and does not get adequate attention: The Peace of Augsburg and its Erastian solution to Protestant/Catholic conflict gets more than enough commentary, but some other religious questions receive superficial attention.
Hopper describes theories of the relationship between church and state associated with thirteenth-century figures such as Marsilius of Padua, who predates the life of Thomas Erastus (1524-1583), as offering "a persuasive statement of the Erastian position" (174).