Eratosthenes


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Related to Eratosthenes: Eratosthenes Sieve
Eratosthenes
BirthplaceCyrene
Occupation
Scholar, librarian, poet and inventor

Eratosthenes

(ĕrətŏs`thənēz), c.275–c.195 B.C., Greek scholar, b. Cyrene. A pupil of CallimachusCallimachus,
fl. c.280–45 B.C., Hellenistic Greek poet and critic, b. Cyrene. Educated at Athens, he taught before obtaining work in the Alexandrian library. There he drew up a catalog, with such copious notes that it constituted a full literary history.
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 in Athens, he became (c.240 B.C.) head of the library at Alexandria. Known for his versatility, he wrote poetry and works (most of them lost) on literature, the theater (notably on ancient comedy), mathematics, astronomy, geography, and philosophy; he also drew a map of the known world and evolved a system of chronology. Especially noted as an astronomer, he is credited with measuring the circumference and tilt of the earth and the size and distance from the earth of the sun and the moon.

Eratosthenes

 

Born circa 276 B.C. in Cyrene; died circa 194 B.C. Greek scholar and scientist.

Eratosthenes was educated in Alexandria and Athens. He headed the library at Alexandria after the death of Callimachus and studied many branches of ancient science. In mathematics he discovered the famous method of finding prime numbers known as the sieve of Eratosthenes. He laid the foundations of mathematical geography; the first person to make an accurate determination of the size of the earth, he calculated the earth’s radius as 6,311 km. Eratosthenes contributed to the development of chronology and astronomy. In philology he produced a study of ancient comedy; his philosophical writings include the dialogue Platonicon. He also wrote on music. Only fragments of Eratosthenes’ works have survived.

Eratosthenes

?276--?194 bc, Greek mathematician and astronomer, who calculated the circumference of the earth by observing the angle of the sun's rays at different places
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Early chapters on Ptolemy, Eratosthenes, Mercator, the Mappa Mundi, and T-O maps are useful readings for introductory classes in mapping or human geography, describing the evolution of early cartography and the translation of exploration (data acquisition) onto paper.
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One of the first head librarians of the library in Alexandria was the mathematician, travel writer, philologist and astronomer Eratosthenes of Cyrene (276-194 BC), author of numerous works from various scientific fields: geography, astronomy, mathematics, philosophy, literature and ethics.
The prolific Greek mathematician and geographer Eratosthenes came to understand that the world wasn't flat when he calculated the circumference of the earth in the third century BC.
Eratosthenes was a Greek mathematician who lived in Egypt in the 3rd Century BC.
Eratosthenes chose for essential improvement the most precise known map of oecumene (inhabited territories) devised by Aristotle's pupil Dicaearchus of Messina (345285 B.
Eratosthenes was appointed chief librarian of the Alexandria Library in Egypt, where he helped researchers while supervising 40 librarians who organized and maintained 700,000 papyrus scrolls.
Measuring such properties of Earth is the realm of geodesy, a time-honored science that dates back to the Greek scholar Eratosthenes, who achieved a surprisingly accurate estimate of the distance around the Earth by using basic geometry.
This particular group includes: Eratosthenes, who measured the circumference of earth with a stick, the sun, and a deep well; Galileo Galilei, who made his own telescopes, defined the early solar system, and founded the science of mechanics; Marie Curie, (Madame, if you please); Isaac Newton; Albert Einstein; and Michael Faraday, among many others.
Readers encounter both the usual suspects (Archimedes, Aristotle, Euclid) as well as lesser known figures such as Eratosthenes, who made a very accurate estimate of the Earth's circumference more than 2000 years ago.
119) See section 8 of "Against Eratosthenes," a speech by Cephalus' son, Lysias, who admits that his father's weapons factory was staffed by slaves.